Brotherhood of St Laurence

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Babies and bosses : reconciling work and family life : Australia, Denmark and the Netherlands : volume 1. /

by Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Publisher: Paris, France OECD 2002Description: 237 p. : ill.Online Access: OECD iLibrary (Read only) Notes: Includes bibliographical references.Availability: (1)

Babies and bosses : reconciling work and family life : Austria, Ireland and Japan : volume 2. /

by Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Publisher: Paris, France Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development 2003Description: 230 p. : ill.Online Access: OECD iLibrary (Read only) Notes: Includes bibliographical references (p. 207-218) See also: Record no. [B11217] Babies and bosses : reconciling work and family life : Australia, Denmark and the Netherlands : volume 1. (2002).Availability: (1)

Life chances : the children's view. /

by Taylor, Janet | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: 2004Description: 8 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: October 2004 Includes bibliographical references (p. 8)Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
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Babies and bosses : reconciling work and family life : New Zealand, Portugal and Switzerland : volume 3. /

by Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Publisher: Paris, France Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development 2004Description: 218 p. : ill.Online Access: OECD iLibrary (Read only) Notes: Bibliography: p. 197-204 See also: Record no. [B11217] Babies and bosses : reconciling work and family life : Australia, Denmark and the Netherlands : volume 1 (2002) and Record no. [B11851] Babies and bosses : reconciling work and family life : Australia, Ireland and Japan : volume 2 (2003)Availability: (1)

How do they do it? : a time-diary analysis of how working mothers find time for the kids. /

by Craig, Lyn.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2005Description: PDF.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Diversity and change in Australian families : statistical profiles. /

by De Vaus, David.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2004Description: xvi, 335 p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Includes bibliographical references (p. 322-328) and index.Summary: Over the last 25 or so years there is hardly an aspect of family life which has not changed. David de Vaus has produced a snapshot of the changing trends family life in Australia. The information has three main focus areas: ; The diversity of family types: couple families, lone parent families, other family types; ; The changes and transitions a family may experience: partnering and separation, decisions to have children or not, transitions in childhood and adolescence into adulthood; ; The issues affecting families: household expenditure, employment issues, childcare, relationship breakdown, caring for older people and people with disabilities in the family.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Disruption of parental relationships, current family circumstances and children's psychological adjustment . /

by Wise, Sarah | Edwards, Ben.

Publisher: 2005Description: HTML.Notes: URL: 'http://www.aifs.gov.au/institute/afrc9/wise2.pdf' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:19:55 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Babies and bosses : reconciling work and family life : Canada, Finland, Sweden and the United Kingdom : volume 4. /

by Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Publisher: Paris, France Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development 2004Description: 244 p. : ill.Online Access: OECD iLibrary (Read only) Notes: Bibliography: p. 217-230 See also: Record no. [B11217] Babies and bosses : reconciling work and family life : Australia, Denmark and the Netherlands : volume 1 (2002 ; Record no. [B11851] Babies and bosses : reconciling work and family life : Australia, Ireland and Japan : volume 2 (2003) ; [B12231] Babies and bosses : reconciling work and family life : New Zealand, Portugal and Switzerland : volume 3.Availability: (1)

Babies and bosses : reconciling work and family life : a synthesis of findings for OECD countries. /

by Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Publisher: Paris, France Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development 2007Description: 213 p. : ill.Online Access: OECD iLibrary (Read only) Notes: See also: Record no. [B11217] Babies and bosses : reconciling work and family life : Australia, Denmark and the Netherlands : volume 1 (2002) Record no. [B11851] Babies and bosses : reconciling work and family life : Australia, Ireland and Japan : volume 2 (2003) and Record no. [B12663] Babies and bosses : reconciling work and family life : Canada, Finland, Sweden and the United Kingdom : volume 4. (2004).Availability: (1)

Families, incomes and jobs, volume 2 : a statistical report on waves 1 to 4 of the HILDA survey /

by Headey, Bruce | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied conomic and Social Research | Warren, Diana.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2007Description: vii, 133 p.Other title: Second Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: HOUSEHOLD, INCOME AND LABOUR DYNAMICS IN AUSTRALIA SURVEY (HILDA) The HILDA Survey is funded by the Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: Commenced in 2001, the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey is a nationally representative panel study of Australian households. The study is funded by the Australian Government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) and is managed by the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research at the University of Melbourne. Roy Morgan Research has conducted the fieldwork since Wave 9 (2009), prior to which The Nielsen Company was the fieldwork provider. This is the eighth volume of the Annual Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey, examining data from the first ten waves of the study, which were conducted between 2001 and 2010. ; The HILDA Survey seeks to provide longitudinal data on the lives of Australian residents. It annually collects information on a wide range of aspects of life in Australia, including household and family relationships, employment, education, income, expenditure, health and wellbeing, attitudes and values on a variety of subjects, and various life events and experiences. [Extract from Introduction]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Families, incomes and jobs : a statistical report of the HILDA survey : volume 1 /

by Headey, Bruce | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied conomic and Social Research | Warren, Diana | Harding, Glenys.

Publisher: Parkville, Vic. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2006Description: 108 p.Other title: First Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: HOUSEHOLD, INCOME AND LABOUR DYNAMICS IN AUSTRALIA SURVEY (HILDA) The HILDA Survey is funded by the Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: Commenced in 2001, the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey is a nationally representative panel study of Australian households. The study is funded by the Australian Government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) and is managed by the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research at the University of Melbourne. Roy Morgan Research has conducted the fieldwork since Wave 9 (2009), prior to which The Nielsen Company was the fieldwork provider. This is the eighth volume of the Annual Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey, examining data from the first ten waves of the study, which were conducted between 2001 and 2010. ; The HILDA Survey seeks to provide longitudinal data on the lives of Australian residents. It annually collects information on a wide range of aspects of life in Australia, including household and family relationships, employment, education, income, expenditure, health and wellbeing, attitudes and values on a variety of subjects, and various life events and experiences. [Extract from Introduction]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Shift work and child behavioural outcomes /

by Han, Wei-Jui.

Publisher: 2008Availability: No items available

Families, incomes and jobs, volume 3 : a statistical report on waves 1 to 5 of the HILDA survey /

by Headey, Bruce | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied conomic and Social Research | Warren, Diana.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2008Description: vi, 141 p. : ill.Other title: Third Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: HOUSEHOLD, INCOME AND LABOUR DYNAMICS IN AUSTRALIA SURVEY (HILDA) The HILDA Survey is funded by the Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: Commenced in 2001, the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey is a nationally representative panel study of Australian households. The study is funded by the Australian Government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) and is managed by the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research at the University of Melbourne. Roy Morgan Research has conducted the fieldwork since Wave 9 (2009), prior to which The Nielsen Company was the fieldwork provider. This is the eighth volume of the Annual Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey, examining data from the first ten waves of the study, which were conducted between 2001 and 2010. ; The HILDA Survey seeks to provide longitudinal data on the lives of Australian residents. It annually collects information on a wide range of aspects of life in Australia, including household and family relationships, employment, education, income, expenditure, health and wellbeing, attitudes and values on a variety of subjects, and various life events and experiences. [Extract from Introduction]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Families, incomes and jobs, volume 4 : a statistical report on waves 1 to 6 of the HILDA survey /

by Wilkins, Roger | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied conomic and Social Research | Warren, Diana | Hahn, Markus.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2009Description: vii, 208 p. : ill.Other title: Fourth Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: HOUSEHOLD, INCOME AND LABOUR DYNAMICS IN AUSTRALIA SURVEY (HILDA) The HILDA Survey is funded by the Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs Includes bibliographical references 17 Aug 2011 : Missing - needs call number change to 306.850994 FAMSummary: Commenced in 2001, the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey is a nationally representative panel study of Australian households. The study is funded by the Australian Government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) and is managed by the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research at the University of Melbourne. Roy Morgan Research has conducted the fieldwork since Wave 9 (2009), prior to which The Nielsen Company was the fieldwork provider. This is the eighth volume of the Annual Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey, examining data from the first ten waves of the study, which were conducted between 2001 and 2010. ; The HILDA Survey seeks to provide longitudinal data on the lives of Australian residents. It annually collects information on a wide range of aspects of life in Australia, including household and family relationships, employment, education, income, expenditure, health and wellbeing, attitudes and values on a variety of subjects, and various life events and experiences. [Extract from Introduction]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Understanding Children's Well-being: a national survey of young people's well-being /

by Rees, Gwyther | Children's Society | Bradshaw, Jonathan | Haridhan, Goswami | Keung, Antonia.

Publisher: London, U.K. The Children's Society 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 90-94Summary: One of the most striking findings of the research was that relatively little (around 5%) of the variation in overall well-being could be explained by individual characteristics, and much of this variation was attributable to age. Family characteristics also have a very small influence on well-being. Well-being is much more strongly associated with the quality of young people's relationships' such as levels of family conflict, than with family structure. Thus, for example, young people who felt that their family got along well together had much higher average levels of well-being than those who did not, irrespective of the family structure they lived in. Twenty one aspects of their lives were also explored in the survey, allowing for a more detailed picture of what was important to children. Family, choice, material possessions, expectations for the future and the home environment came out strongly in this analysis. Confidence, school, schoolwork and friendships were revealed as some of the least important aspects associated with overall happiness.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The best start : supporting happy, healthy childhoods /

by Baxter, Jennifer | Australian Institute of Family Studies | Gray, Matthew | Hayes, Alan.

Publisher: Melbourne, Victoria Australian Institute of Family Studies 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 4Summary: To support the 2010 National Families Week, the Australian Institute of Family Studies has prepared this Facts Sheet about the role that families and communities play in giving children the best possible start to life.Availability: (1)

Footprints in Time - The Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children (LSIC)' [Website]

by Australia. Department of Social Services.

Online Access: Website | DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Footprints in Time Key Summary Report from Wave 1 ; Wave 2 ; Wave 3 ; Wave 4 ; Wave 5Summary: Footprints in Time is the name given to the Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children (LSIC), an initiative of the Australian Government. Footprints in Time is conducted by the Department of Social Services (DSS) under the guidance of the Footprints in Time Steering Committee, chaired by Professor Mick Dodson AM. LSIC is one of a suite of longitudinal studies within the National Centre for Longitudinal Data (NCLD) in DSS. The study includes two groups of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children who were aged 6 to 18 months (B cohort) and 3½ - 5 years (K cohort) when the study began in 2008. In wave 1, over 1,680 interviews were conducted with the children’s parents or primary carers (usually the mothers) and over 265 interviews were conducted with fathers or other significant carers. Subsequent waves experienced strong support from these initial interviewees. To date, Footprints in Time interviewers have successfully contacted and interviewed over 1,200 of these original families in each subsequent wave. Additional families were introduced within our wave 2 interviews and have shown a similarly strong commitment to Footprints in Time. Interviews are primarily conducted by Department of Social Services Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Research Administration Officers (RAOs). Interviews may also be conducted by other National Office Indigenous and non-Indigenous staff when required. Availability: (2)

Getting what we need : families' experiences of services /

by McArthur, Morag | Australian Catholic University. Institute of Child rotection Studies | Thomson, Lorraine | Winkworth, Gail | Butler, Kate.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 2010Description: HTML.Summary: This report documents the experiences of 80 parents on income support regarding their needs, their levels of formal and informal supports and their interactions with services. This qualitative study, undertaken by the Australian Catholic University's Institute of Child Protection Studies on behalf of the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, was designed to gain a deeper understanding of the experiences of families with complex needs in order to inform more responsive and integrated service delivery.Availability: No items available

Families, incomes and jobs, volume 5 : a statistical report on waves 1 to 7 of the Household, income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey /

by Wilkins, Roger | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied conomic and Social Research | Warren, Diana | Hahn, Markus | Houng, Brendan.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2010Description: vii, 167 p. : ill.Other title: Fifth Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: HOUSEHOLD, INCOME AND LABOUR DYNAMICS IN AUSTRALIA SURVEY (HILDA) The HILDA Survey is funded by the Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: This is the fifth volume of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey Annual Statistical Report, and examines data from the first seven waves of the HILDA Survey, which were conducted between 2001 and 2007. As in Volume 4, the report contains two parts. Part A contains short articles providing an annual update on changes in key aspects of life in Australia that are measured by the HILDA Survey every year. Four broad and very much overlapping ?life domains? are covered: household and family life; incomes and economic wellbeing; labour market outcomes; and life satisfaction, health and wellbeing. The second part of the report, Part B, contains articles on irregular topics, to a significant extent influenced by wave-specific questions included in the survey. The HILDA Survey seeks to provide nationally representative longitudinal data on Australian residents describing the ways in which people's lives are changing. ; HOUSEHOLD, INCOME AND LABOUR DYNAMICS IN AUSTRALIA SURVEY (HILDA)Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

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