Brotherhood of St Laurence

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Economics in the Time of COVID-19 / Edited by Richard Baldwin and Beatrice Weder di Mauro

by Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) | Baldwin Richard (ed.) | Weder di Mauro, Beatrice (ed.).

Publisher: London, U.K. : CEPR Press, 2020Description: 115 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: A CEPR Press VoxEU.org eBookSummary: COVID-19 is spreading human suffering worldwide; that is what we should all be focused on. But we are not doctors. We are economists – and COVID-19 is most definitely spreading economic suffering worldwide. The virus may in fact be as contagious economically as it is medically. Joining the OECD’s dire growth forecast of 2 March 2020, the European Commission said on 4 March 2020 that both Italy and France are at risk of slipping into recession, and the IMF said it sees “more dire” possibilities ahead for the global economy. This book is an extraordinary effort for extraordinary times. On Thursday 27 February, we emailed a group of leading economists to see if they’d contribute to the effort. The authors responded and the eBook came together literally over the weekend (the deadline for contributions was Monday 2 March 2020). The eBook is a testimony to the power of collaboration in a network that has the size, speed, flexibility, and talent of CEPR. The key economic questions addressed in the book are: How, and how far and fast, will the economic damage spread? How bad will it get? How long will the damage last? What are the mechanisms of economic contagion? And, above all, what can governments do about it? Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Mitigating the COVID economic crisis : act fast and do whatever it takes / edited by Richard Baldwin and Beatrice Weder di Mauro

by Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) | Baldwin Richard (ed.) | Weder di Mauro, Beatrice (ed.).

Publisher: London, U.K. : CEPR Press, 2020Description: 219 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: A CEPR Press VoxEU.org eBookSummary: The COVID-19 crisis has become more predictable in a sense. What was widely viewed as a ‘Chinese problem,’ and then an ‘Italian problem’ has become an ‘everybody problem’. With few exceptions, governments initially downplay the disease until sustained community transmission takes hold. Then they impose severe social distancing policies, work and school closures and the like. This inevitably leads to almost immediate economic hardship, which then leads governments to propose increasingly bold anti-recession measures. This was the pattern in Europe and looks set to be the pattern in the US and many other nations. All this is due to the highly contagious nature of the virus, and the inexorable implications of its explosive spread during the ‘acceleration phase’ of the epidemic. This eBook is an attempt to collect the thinking of leading economists on what is to be done. In addition to contributing to analysis of the rapidly evolving policy reactions, we hope this eBook will help nations get ahead of the curve – to think ahead on the medical and economic policies that will be needed. The collected wisdom of our authors also points to another critical aspect of this crisis. Without care, solutions to one set of economic problems could – for some nations – turn this economic crisis into a financial crisis, or a debt crisis, or a foreign exchange crisis, etc. Care must be taken to ensure that temporary solutions don’t create long-lasting problems.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Learning at home during COVID-19 : effects on vulnerable young Australians : independent rapid response report

by Brown, Natalie | Te Riele, Kitty | Shelley, Becky | Woodroffe, Jessica | Peter Underwood Centre for Educational Attainment, University of Tasmania.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Department of Education, Skills and Employment, 2020Description: 77 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: April 2020 "Learning at home during COVID-19: Effects on vulnerable young Australians" is one of the five five pieces of research to examine the potential impact of remote learning from home on educational outcomes for vulnerable cohorts of children, including barriers to access and evidence-based actions to respond. https://www.dese.gov.au/covid-19/schoolsSummary: Nearly half the national school student population are at risk of having their learning and wellbeing significantly compromised by not being at school because they are either an early years’ student or are in a vulnerable group. As soon as health restrictions permit there is an urgent need to reconnect these students to the physical context of school-based learning to support their learning and wellbeing outcomes. Concurrently there is a need to invest rapidly in developing significant capability in schools to deliver education both online and on-site. FOR HEALTH REASONS EDUCATION IN AUSTRALIA HAS SHIFTED TO PREDOMINANTLY HOME-BASED, ONLINE LEARNING The outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has been declared a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC) and the virus has now spread to each State and Territory in Australia. To help contain the spread of COVID-19 a significant number of public, Catholic and independent schools have implemented home-based, online learning. HOWEVER, THE HOME-BASED, ONLINE MODEL IS HARMING LEARNING, ESPECIALLY IN THE EARLY YEARS AND IN VULNERABLE GROUPS Nearly half (46%) of Australian children and young people are at risk adverse effects on their educational outcomes, nutrition, physical movement, social, and emotional wellbeing by being physically disconnected from school. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Ministerial Briefing Paper on evidence of the likely impact on educational outcomes of vulnerable children learning at home during COVID-19

by Masters, Geoff | Australian Council for Educational Research.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Department of Education, Skills and Employment, 2020Description: 18 p. PDF.Other title: Submitted to: Australian Government Department of Education, Skills and Employment.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: April 2020 "Improving Learning" "Ministerial Briefing Paper on Evidence of the Likely Impact on Educational Outcomes of Vulnerable Children Learning at Home during COVID-19" is one of the five five pieces of research to examine the potential impact of remote learning from home on educational outcomes for vulnerable cohorts of children, including barriers to access and evidence-based actions to respond. https://www.dese.gov.au/covid-19/schoolsSummary: Vulnerability in this paper is considered from two interrelated perspectives: social and educational. ● Socially vulnerable children are over-represented among the group of students who are educationally vulnerable. ● The negative impact of educational vulnerability on students’ capacity to learn across all areas of the curriculum is exacerbated by their reduced access to resources at home (e.g., adequate food and shelter, ICT, a quiet place to work, books, learning support from parents), and is associated with social vulnerability. This is, in effect, a continuous cycle of disadvantage. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Supporting vulnerable children in the face of a pandemic : supporting vulnerable children in the face of a pandemic

by Clinton, Janet | University of Melbourne. Centre for Program Evaluation, Melbourne Graduate School of Education.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Department of Education, Skills and Employment, 2020Description: 30 p. PDF.Other title: Supporting vulnerable children In the face of a pandemic : a paper prepared for the Australian Government Department of Education, Skills and Employment. Centre.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: April 2020 "Supporting vulnerable children In the face of a pandemic" is one of the five five pieces of research to examine the potential impact of remote learning from home on educational outcomes for vulnerable cohorts of children, including barriers to access and evidence-based actions to respond. - https://www.dese.gov.au/covid-19/schoolsSummary: This paper particularly focuses on factors that will impede access to quality education, of the effects on the more vulnerable groups, and it outlines models of support and recovery that evidence suggests are useful. This brief synthesis draws parallels from literature on natural disasters and school interruptions such as school holidays, teacher strikes, economic downturn, and natural disasters such as earthquakes and hurricanes. According to the Productivity Commission, disadvantage in Australia needs to be assessed against three metrics: relative income poverty, material deprivation (inability to afford life’s essentials), and social exclusion. Children experiencing these metrics can include those living very low SES contexts, jobless households, children with special needs either physical or psychological, children with language other than English backgrounds and refugee populations, rural and remote contexts, and Indigenous Australians and Torres Strait islanders. Recently, low digital inclusion has been considered an additional category particularly when this interacts with the other categories. It is useful to consider the impact of the current pandemic from a Population Life Course perspective which illustrates the determinants of Education and its efforts in in reducing vulnerability. The figure below illustrates the trajectory for those in the existing vulnerable, the potential vulnerable and the protected categories within the population along with those determinants of education that drive the curve up or down. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Impact of learning from home on educational outcomes for disadvantaged children

by Lamb, Stephen | Centre for International Research on Education Systems (CIRES) | Mitchell Institute.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Department of Education, Skills and Employment, 2020Description: 20 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: "Brief assessment" "Impact of learning from home on educational outcomes for disadvantaged children" is one of the five five pieces of research to examine the potential impact of remote learning from home on educational outcomes for vulnerable cohorts of children, including barriers to access and evidence-based actions to respond. - https://www.dese.gov.au/covid-19/schoolsSummary: The onset of the Coronavirus pandemic has required schools to establish learning from home for the majority of children across Australia, bringing rapid rollout of online education. At this time, the main goal is to ensure that all children are able to continue to access learning and to move student learning forward. But not all children are equally well placed to do this. Some children are already at risk of school failure for a variety of reasons and having to learn from home brings with it some major additional challenges for them. Those at risk include a wide variety of students such as those who live in poverty, often characterized by low socioeconomic status, those with a disability or additional learning needs, students in rural or remote parts of Australia, and those who are indigenous. What will the effects on outcomes be for more vulnerable children of learning from home? Research to date gives us some clues and also points to why some children are more vulnerable in the home learning context, the numbers affected and what will need to be considered in working out what needs to be done in supporting the students who are most likely to struggle in the online setting. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The impact of ‘learning at home’ on the educational outcomes of vulnerable children in Australia during the COVID- 19 pandemic / a summary literature review prepared by the National Centre for Student Equity in Higher Education (NCSEHE) for the Department of Education, Skills and Employment

by Drane, Cathy | Curtin University. National Centre for Student Equality in Higher Education | Vernon, Lynette | O'Shea, Sarah.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Department of Education, Skills and Employment, 2020Description: 17 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: "The impact of ‘learning at home’ on the educational outcomes of vulnerable children in Australia during the COVID- 19 pandemic "is one of the five five pieces of research to examine the potential impact of remote learning from home on educational outcomes for vulnerable cohorts of children, including barriers to access and evidence-based actions to respond. - https://www.dese.gov.au/covid-19/schoolsSummary: This review provides an overview of current approaches to managing school closures as well as recent literature related to young people learning "outside of school". A range of material has been drawn upon to both highlight the educational issues of this learning context, as well as the psychosocial and emotional repercussions. This summary literature review combines research on technology and learning, online learning and distance learning with very recent analysis of the educational impacts of COVID-19. Globally, while some countries have opted for a mass school shut-down, many schools remain open for more vulnerable students (UNESCO, 2020a). This "partial closure" is not only to enable learning in smaller targeted groups but also to offer a "safe" sanctuary for those who desperately need a regulated and secure environment including the provision of "free" hot food and also, compaAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Design principles for fiscal policy in a pandemic : how to create jobs in the short term and lasting benefits in the long term

by Denniss, Richard | Australia Institute | Grundnoff, Matt | Richardson, David.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T : Australia Institute, 2020Description: 36 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: April 2020 "Discussion Paper"Summary: The economic crisis brought on by the coronavirus pandemic requires fast, large, effective and well targeted fiscal stimulus. While the size of the government’s initial three spending packages is appropriate as an initial response, both the shape of that response and the design of future spending measures need to be carefully evaluated. While the current economic downturn may resemble the beginning of previous recessions, because the cause of the downturn is so different, government responses must be structured quite differently than any previous downturn. Most of the current contraction in the tourism, retail, food and entertainment industries is the direct result of government health policies designed to ensure social distancing, and, as a result, traditional approaches to ‘stimulus’ cannot succeed in boosting output in these industries. Governments need to think far more creatively about how to not just provide income to the millions of people adversely effected by government lockdowns, they also have to think far more creatively about how to utilise the labour of millions of Australians who will be unable to perform their usual roles for the duration of the lockdown. In short, the government’s approach of ‘temporary and targeted’ stimulus needs to evolve quickly into an approach that is ‘structural and sustained’. In addition to the short-term welfare, cash flow and wage subsidy measures that have already been announced, the government also needs to provide ongoing support to the structure of the economy. The government will be confronted in the coming months with a vast range of potential projects that it could fund to create jobs and maintain some economic activity. This paper provides design principles for evaluating such proposals to ensure that future spending packages are as effective as possible. In the short term, the government must pump not just money into the economy, but also into jobs. And in the long term, if the jobs that governments create in the coming year deliver lasting benefits then our community won’t be ‘saddled with debt’, it will be blessed with new assets. Just as the Art Deco ocean baths built during the Great Depression still provide benefits long after they stopped providing jobs, so too can the projects state and federal governments undertake in the Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Shutdown : estimating the COVID-19 employment shock

by Coates, Brendan | Grattan Institute | Cowgill, Matt | Chen, Tony et al.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic : Grattan Institute, 2020Description: 59 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: April 2020 This working paper was written by Brendan Coates, Matt Cowgill, Tony Chen, and Will Mackey.Summary: Australia faces an unprecedented economic challenge in the coming weeks and months. Never before has such a large proportion of economic activity come to such a sudden stop. Never before has such a large slowdown been deliberately engineered as a matter of public policy – in this case, to protect public health during a global pandemic. COVID-19 is already having a big impact on the livelihoods of many Australians. This is visible at Centrelink offices around the country, as people queue to be added to the income support rolls, and visible in the form of closed shopfronts in all Australian cities, suburbs, and towns. But the size of the employment shock from the COVID-19 response is not yet known and will not be known for weeks, even months. In this working paper, we estimate the hit to employment from mandatory and voluntary spatial distancing. We calculate that between 14 and 26 per cent of Australian workers – 1.9-to-3.4 million people – could be out of work in the coming weeks as a result of spatial distancing measures to contain the spread of COVID-19, if they aren’t already. More than half of all workers in the hospitality industry could be off work due to COVID-19. Many workers in retail trade, education and training and the arts are also at risk. Lower-income workers are twice as likely to be out of work as high-income earners. Younger Australians and women are likely to be hit hardest, because they are more likely to be employed in occupations and industries most affected by the response to COVID-19. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Coronavirus : what does it mean for people restricted by poverty?

by Barnard, Helen.

Publisher: Joseph Rowntree Foundation 2020Description: Online resource.Online Access: Online resource Notes: 18th March 2020Summary: As we come to terms with what Coronavirus could mean for us and our families, we urge the Government to keep people who are restricted by low incomes front of mind. In a just and compassionate society, we all rely on one another for support in difficult times, within communities, and when acting together through national and local government, as well as charitable responses. People locked in poverty face particular challenges staying afloat in the face of rising costs and income loss that will come as a result of the Coronavirus outbreak. They are also more likely to be in poor health, disabled, and to be caring for others. In addition, people stuck in poverty are more likely to experience anxiety, depression and other mental health difficulties. The services on which people on low incomes rely are also at risk of disruption, such as food banks and advice teams. The millions of workers trapped in poverty are more likely to have insecure jobs, with fewer rights and employee benefits, and they are less likely to have savings to help cover additional unplanned costs or gaps in income. It is vital that the Government and other organisations in the UK take all possible action to reduce both financial pressure and increased anxiety Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Seizing the opportunity : transforming the Australian youth employment system in and after Covid-19 / Prepared by the BSL’s Youth Opportunities Research & Policy & Youth Transitions teams

by Brotherhood of St Laurence Youth Opportunities, Research and Policy and Youth Transitions teams | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Youth Opportunities Research & Policy | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Youth Transitions.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2020Description: [35 p. ] : ill. PDF.Other title: The case for a new National Youth Employment Framework.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: May 2020Summary: Prior to the Covid-19 pandemic, the appetite for changing Australia’s youth employment service system was steadily building. Since 2016 the Federal government has: — established a standalone youth employment service: Transition To Work — actively engaged with a national network of providers: Transition to Work Community of Practice (TtW CoP). Together they are evolving a fidelity employment service model built on evidence — funded the National Youth Employment Body (NYEB) to foster innovation and develop a co-designed, evidence informed ‘local to national’ framework to create youth employment opportunities in place — implementing PaTH, a national work experience and placement program for young people Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Redesigning employment services after Covid-19

by Per Capita | Casey, Simone | Lewis, Abigail.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic : Per Capita 2020Description: 21 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: April 2020Summary: This Per Capita discussion paper argues there is a need to redesign employment services to better meet the needs of people experiencing unemployment after the COVID-19 economic shock. Current estimates suggest as many as 700,000 people may soon be signed up to jobactive employment services.1 If these estimates are correct, the number of people using these services will effectively be doubled in a very short period of time. Based on the existing fee structure, our estimates indicate that funding existing jobactive providers to provide employment services to 700,000 new recipients will cost the government around $210 million.2 Further, during the economic recovery, jobactive provider incomes will be boosted by ‘outcome fees’ that will total $1515 per person when people made unemployed by COVID-19 get back into work.3 Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Youth employment solutions in COVID-19 and beyond

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2020Description: 14 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: May 2020 Prepared by the Brotherhood of St LaurenceSummary: The Transition to Work National Community of Practice with the National Youth Employment Body are working collaboratively to improve employment outcomes for young people, business and local communities across Australia.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Social protection and jobs responses to COVID-19 : a real-time review of country measures /

by Gentilini, Ugo | World Bank | Almefi, Mohamed | Orton, Ian | International Labour Organization.

Edition: 3rd ed.Publisher: Washington, DC : [World Bank], 2020Description: 87 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: “Living paper” version 3 (April 3, 2020) Authors: Ugo Gentilini (World Bank), Mohamed Almenfi (World Bank) and Ian Orton (ILO)Summary: This third edition of the “living paper” contributes to the global knowledge on how countries are responding to the pandemic by documenting real-time actions in a key area of response – that is,social protection measures planned or implemented by governments. For the purpose of this review, we organized interventions by social assistance, social insurance and labor market programs. For the latter measures, we deliberately focused on supply-side programs (e.g., mostly wage subsidies and other activation programs). In most cases, data sources include official information published in government websites, while in many cases we reported information from global and national news outlets. In some cases, information was provided directly by country-based experts, while the full database was validated and integrated by regional and country social protection teams at the World Bank. Overall, findings should be considered preliminary and interpreted with caution. The information on country-level measures presented in this review is continuously verified, triangulated and enriched, with updated versions being released on a weekly basis (i.e., every Friday). This would help provide a “situation room” with a view to inform decisionmakers, practitioners and the broad public about the most recent policy and operational developments in the sphere of social protection responses to COVID-19. The reminder of the note zooms into a country-by-country examination of measures presented in tabular form. The structure by social assistance, insurance, and labor interventions is accompanied by moregranular reporting of specific schemes and their summary description. Sources are provided as weblinks in footnotes. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Hardship, distress, and resilience : the initial impacts of COVID-19 in Australia / ANU Centre for Social Research and Methods ; Professor Nicholas Biddle ; A/Professor Ben Edwards ; Professor Matthew Gray, ; Kate Sollis

by Biddle, Nicholas | Australian National University. Centre for Social Research and Methods | Edward, Ben | Gray, Matthew et al.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T Australian National University. Centre for Social Research and Methods May 2020Description: i, 43 p. : ill. PDF.Other title: COVID-19 impacts.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: 7 May 2020 "ANUPoll #33 (collected April 2020) – (doi:10.26193/HLMZNW)" - title pageSummary: This paper provides a summary of the impact of COVID-19 on labour market outcomes, income, financial stress, social cohesiveness, political attitudes, subjective wellbeing, and psychological distress. It is based on data from the 33rd ANUpoll which collected information from 3,155 Australians over the period 14-27 April 2020. It is the first longitudinal survey data on the impact of COVID-19 in Australia, with respondents to the April ANUpoll also interviewed in January and February 2020. The findings suggest large declines in employment and income, significant increases in social isolation and psychological distress, changes in household structure, and significant uncertainty about the future. At the same time, we observe greater confidence in government and the public service, large improvements in social trust, and substantial observance of physical distancing measures.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

COVID-19 roadmap to recovery : a report for the nations

by Group of Eight Australia | Thomson, Vicki.

Publisher: [S.l.] Group of Eight Australia (go8), 2020Description: 190 p. : ill. PDF.Other title: GO8 COVID-19 roadmap to recovery.Online Access: Main report | Summary | Website Notes: This report is independent, was not commissioned by a Government, and was produced by the leading researchers in this nation based on the latest evidence available. Link to main report and summary. Available on website are links to COVID-19 Roadmap to Recovery – A Report for the Nation (Summary) ; COVID-19 Roadmap to Recovery – A Report for the Nation ; COVID-19 Roadmap to Recovery – Snapshot; Group of eight members: University of Adelaide ; Australian National University ; University of Melbourne ; Monash University ; University of New South Wales ; University of Queensland ; University of Sydney ; University of Western Australia.; Vicki Thomson Go8 Chief Executive - page 5Summary: Covid-19 has changed the course of history. What started off as a flu-like illness in one person in one corner of the world, has changed the lives, livelihoods and futures of billions. Australia saw its first case on January 25 and now has over 6,600 cases, the country is in partial lockdown, schools and universities have left their campuses, hundreds of thousands of jobs have been lost. Fortunately, the tide appears to be turning and we can start thinking of Recovery. To chart a Roadmap to Recovery we convened a group of over a hundred of the country’s leading epidemiologists, infectious disease consultants, public health specialists, healthcare professionals, mental health and well-being practitioners, indigenous scholars, communications and behaviour change experts, ethicists, philosophers, political scientists, economists and business scholars from the Group of Eight (Go8) universities. The group developed this Roadmap in less than three weeks, through remote meetings and a special collaborative reasoning platform, in the context of a rapidly changing pandemic. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

How COVID-19 is changing the world : a statistical perspective

by Committee for the Coordination of Statistical Activities (CCSA).

Publisher: [S.l.] : Committee for the Coordination of Statistical Activitie (CCSA), 2020Description: 87 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: COVID-19 has turned the world upside down. Everything has been impacted. How we live and interact with each other, how we work and communicate, how we move around and travel. Every aspect of our lives has been affected. Although the world is in lockdown, governments, epidemiologists, school principals, entrepreneurs and families around the world are already planning the next steps: how to safely reopen schools and businesses, how to commute and travel without transmitting or contracting infection, how to support those most affected by the crisis – the millions who have lost their livelihoods or their loved ones, how to ensure the already serious inequalities don’t deteriorate further. Decisions made now and in the coming months will be some of the most important made in generations. They will affect people all around the world for years to come. It is imperative that governments making those decisions have access to the best information available. Throughout this crisis, the international statistics community has continued to work together, in partnership with national statistical offices and systems around the world to ensure that the best quality data and statistics are available to support decision making during and after the crisis. This report gives a small flavor of that cooperation. It has been compiled jointly by 36 international organizations, under the aegis of the Committee for the Coordination of Statistical Activities (CCSA). Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Early Childhood Education and Care Relief Package : Four Week Review.

by Australia. Department of Education, Skills and Employment.

Publisher: Canberra, Australian Capital Territory : Department of Education, Skills and Employment, 2020Description: 7. p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Summary Report 18 May 2020Summary: The Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) Relief Package was announced on 2 April 2020 as a temporary measure to ensure the viability of the ECEC Sector and the continued provision of care for children of essential workers and vulnerable children (for the period 6 April to 28 June 2020). The review has been informed by available departmental data, feedback from stakeholders through submissions and targeted consultations, and an online survey of 7,301 service providers undertaken on behalf of the department by ORIMA Research between 24 April and 4 May 2020.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Pain without gain: why school closures are bad policy

by Joseph, Blaise | Centre for Independent Studies | Fahey, Glenn.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W Centre for Independent Studies, 2020Description: 13 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: May 2020Summary: School policy during Covid-19 involves difficult choices; balancing health, economic, and education issues. The decision by state and territory governments to strongly advise parents to keep their children at home can accurately be described as ‘school closures’, because for the small minority of children who still attend school, their learning is almost the same as at-home learning, rather than normal face-to-face classes. Also, most parents would have to make the difficult decision to ignore the public health announcements from their state or territory government in order to send their children to school. The decision by state and territory governments to close schools went against the health, economic, and educational evidence. It was clear there was little health benefit, while there were substantial economic and educational costs. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Slack in the system : the economic cost of under employment

by Lloyd-Cape, Matthew | Per Capita.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic : Per Capita 2020Description: 28 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: May 2020Summary: The April 2020 Labour Force data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) revealed the depth and breadth of the COVID-19 pandemic’s economic impact on the lives of working Australians. The month on month figures are sobering: the youth unemployment rate jumped to 13.8%, the underutilisation rate increased by 5.9 points to 19.9%, and the number of Australians abandoning the labour market rose an unprecedented 2.4% - that is almost half a million people who are not only out of work, but have stopped looking for a job altogether. Given that we are only weeks into the biggest economic shock Australia has ever experienced, such carnage in the labour market is unsurprising, and certainly not confined to our shores. The April data, however, provides only part of the picture: for example, it remains to be seen how many furloughed workers, kept attached to the labour force by the JobKeeper package and thus excluded from unemployment figures, will return to the jobs they had before the pandemic. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

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