Brotherhood of St Laurence

Refine your search

Your search returned 212 results.

Not what you expected? Check for suggestions
OECD Economic Surveys : Australia /

by Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Publisher: Paris, France OECD 1972 -Description: Various volumes.Online Access: Website Notes: Annual series publication 1999-2000 ; 2000-2001 ; 2003-2004 ; 2004 ; 2006 ; 2008 ; 2010 ; 2012 ; 2014 ; 2017 ; 2018 ; 2021 Publications also available to read online. Summary: OECD’s periodic surveys of the Australian economy. Each edition surveys the major challenges faced by the country, evaluates the short-term outlook, and makes specific policy recommendations. Special chapters take a more detailed look at specific challenges. Extensive statistical information is included in charts and graphs. [Publisher website]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (10).

Skill and Australia's productivity surge : staff research paper

by Barnes, Paula | Australia. Productivity Commission | Kennard, Sharon.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Productivity Commission 2002Description: xix, 74 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography: p. 71-74 October 2002 Website : http://www.pc.gov.auAvailability: (1)

Babies and bosses : reconciling work and family life : Australia, Denmark and the Netherlands : volume 1. /

by Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Publisher: Paris, France OECD 2002Description: 237 p. : ill.Online Access: OECD iLibrary (Read only) Notes: Includes bibliographical references.Availability: (1)

Blue collared : the shrinking world of work in Tasmania /

by Madden, Kelly | Anglicare Tasmania.

Publisher: Hobart, Tas. Anglicare Tasmania 2003Description: 95 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: May 2003 Summary: The qualitative component of this research indicates that unemployed people had a strong preference for permanent employment, placing a very high value on the paid entitlements and sense of security. Many of the participants had extensive experience of casual work but this had not led to more permanent employment. This research indicates that the distinct categories of ‘unemployed’ and ‘casual worker’ which emerge from static accounts of the labour market would be much more accurately conceptualised as a cycle, with a sub-group of people moving between casual work and unemployment on a very regular basis.Availability: (1)

School leavers in Australia : profiles and pathways. /

by McMillan, Julie | Marks, Gary N.

Publisher: Camberwell, Vic. Australian Council for Educational Research 2003Description: xiv, 117 p. ; ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: May 2003 Bibliography: p. 92-94Availability: (1)

Understanding and improving data quality relating to low-income households. /

by Johnson, David | Scutella, Rosanna.

Publisher: [Parkville, Vic.] Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2003Description: 74 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: In this report the issues concerning the reliability of data and the implications for the measurement of inequality, poverty and social welfare are explored. There are both conceptual and practical issues of concern. The conceptual issues relate to the choice of the most appropriate unit of observation, period of observation, metric of measurement and source of data. The most natural unit of observation is the income unit, but since income units may share resources such as housing, the most practical unit is the household. Income data are generally available on both a current weekly basis and an annual basis. Some expenditure data are available on a current basis but lumpiness of expenditure in relation to durables and housing often mean that annual data will be the most reliable measure for small groups. There are enduring debates about the usefulness of concepts of poverty, relative and absolute; and of measures of inequality in describing the circumstances of people. There are also longstanding debates about the limitations of measurement relying on income and expenditure which are narrow measures of circumstance, and which ignore the benefits of in-kind provision of health, education and other services.Availability: (1)

The new economy revisited : an initial analysis of the digital divide among financially disadvantaged families /

by McLaren, Jennifer | The Smith Family | Zappala, Gianni.

Publisher: Camperdown, N.S.W. Research and Social Policy Team, The Smith Family 2002Description: viii, 28 p. ill.Other title: The Smith Family. Research and Social Policy Team background.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: September 2002 Summary: This paper presents new data on the access and usage of Information and Communications Technology (ICT), in particular, computers and the Internet, by households and children from financially disadvantaged backgrounds. The existence of unequal access and usage of ICT across the population – the ‘digital divide’, is compounding disadvantage for some, because having access to ICT is becoming so central to being able to fully participate in the economic, social, political and cultural spheres of society. This is the first of several publications that provides empirical data to complement previous conceptual work on the ‘new economy’ and the digital divide. This paper focuses on what has been termed the ‘A’ of the ‘ABCs of the digital divide’ – Access, Basic Training and Content. The data come from a survey aimed at collecting benchmark data on computer and Internet access and usage among students and families on The Smith Family’s Learning for Life (LFL) program. Availability: (1)

The invisible women. : a report on gender-based persecution claims by women asylum seekers in Australia.

by Cauchi, Stephanie | Feminist Layers | Ierodiaconou, Mary-Jane | Perry, Angela | Women Rights Action Network Australia.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Feminist Lawyers and Women Rights Action Network Australia 2003Description: iv, 71 p.Notes: November 2003Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Residential aged care in Australia 2001-02 : a statistical overview /

by Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2003Description: xii, 88 p.Other title: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare [AIHW]. Aged care.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Includes bibliographical references. AIHW cat. no. AGE 29Summary: The report provides comprehensive statistical information on residential aged care services and their residents. The report contains information on the capacity of residential aged care services, their residents and resident characteristics, levels of dependency among residents, and admissions and separations. The report will be particularly useful to aged care service planners, providers of aged care services, and researchers in the field.Availability: (1)

Babies and bosses : reconciling work and family life : Austria, Ireland and Japan : volume 2. /

by Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Publisher: Paris, France Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development 2003Description: 230 p. : ill.Online Access: OECD iLibrary (Read only) Notes: Includes bibliographical references (p. 207-218) See also: Record no. [B11217] Babies and bosses : reconciling work and family life : Australia, Denmark and the Netherlands : volume 1. (2002).Availability: (1)

The dynamics of child poverty in Australia.

by Abello, Annie | University of Canberra. National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling | Harding, Ann.

Publisher: Bruce, A.C.T. National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling. University of Canberra 2004Description: v, 56 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: March 2004 Summary: This paper provides new information about how family incomes and the state of poverty of Australian households with children changed from year to year in the mid-1990s. The study is based on data from the Survey of Employment and Unemployment Patterns, a longitudinal survey that followed a group of respondents between September 1994 and September 1997. The paper defines poverty according to different thresholds and the child poverty rates that result from these thresholds. The poverty rates were calculated using gross income and are not directly comparable with the usual poverty rates based on disposable income. The paper begins with a description of the extent and pattern of income dynamics among families with children. This is followed by analyses of the family characteristics of children persistently in poverty, as well as children moving into and out of poverty based on four poverty thresholds and using variables on both current and annual income. The study also investigates whether there are differences between the outcomes for all dependent children and young children (those less than 15 years old). Availability: (1)

Residential aged care in Australia 2002-03 : a statistical overview /

by Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2004Description: PDF.Other title: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare [AIHW]. Aged care.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Globalization [globalisation], inequality and the rich countries of the G-20 : evidence from the Luxembourg Income Study (LIS). /

by Smeeding, Timothy M | University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2002Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: December 2002 Bibliography: p. 30-34Availability: (1)

No child left behind?

by Smeeding, Timothy M | University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2002Description: 24 p. : ill. PDF.Other title: SPRC Discussion Paper ; no. 121.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: December 2002 Summary: The title of this article is taken from the inspirational slogan of President George W. Bush, whose recently passed Elementary and Sunday Education Act bears this title. In this bill, as in the 1996 Welfare Reform Act, accountability won the day over federal fiscal support for low-income families. Of course, the 1996 Welfare Reform Act is a major ‘accountability’ success story, with the AFDC/TANF caseloads (households) falling from over 5.0 million in 1994 and 4.5 million in 1996 to 2.2 million cases by June 2000, about one third of the 6.6 million households which benefited from the SSI program in that same year (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2002; Smeeding 2001). But, what is the larger context is within which we should interpret these programmatic changes and slogans? The slogan clearly challenges us to judge a society by how well it treats its children. But when we compare the well-being of American children Canadian or European kids, can we really say that the United States not left any of its children behind? What can we say about equality of opportunity or fair life chances for America’s children compared to their counterparts in other rich countries? The rest of this paper summarizes the poverty status of American children and then the variance in their ‘real’ standard of living. The we briefly look at the reason why low-income American children and their parents are in such straits and conclude with a few low cost policy suggestions on how to improve the living standards of poor children, so that their greater accountability and better labor market for performance is rewarded by better family outcomes. Availability: (1)
Lists:

Community aged care packages in Australia 2002-03 : a statistical overview. /

by Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2003Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.aihw.gov.au/publications/age/cacpa02-03/cacpa02-03.pdf' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:17:09 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The comparability of dependency information across three aged and community care programs . /

by Van Doeland, M | Benham, C | Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2004Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.aihw.gov.au/publications/age/cditaccp/cditaccp.pdf' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:17:12 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Indicators of Australia's welfare : development and discussion. /

by Bricknell, Samantha | Australian Institute of Health and Welfare | Fortune, Nicola | Madden, Ros.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2004Description: xiii, 121 p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: March 2004 Bibliography: p. 109-121 Link to online PDFAvailability: (1)

Prosperity for all? : how low income families have fared in the boom times /

by McNamara, Justine | National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling | Lloyd, Rachel | Toohey, Matthew | Harding, Ann.

Publisher: 2005; Bruce, A.C.T. National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling. University of Canberra 2004Description: iv, 45 p. : ill. bibliog.p.32.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Also presented at the 9th AIFS Conference: Families Matter 2005; 14 October 2004 Summary: This report assesses how low-income Australian families with children have fared over the last six years, compared with other families. The researchers found that on average real incomes did rise between 1997–98 and 2004–05 for families with children in the bottom income quintile (the lowest 20%), and just kept up with increases in median family incomes. It should be noted that most of their income increase came from transfer payments (especially increased family tax benefits). The lowest income group did not, however, “catch up” relative to all families with children; and their increased incomes are likely to have been eroded by price increases such as those arising from the GST.Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).

Evaluation of the Saver Plus pilot project : interim report /

by Russell, Roslyn | RMIT University | Fredline, Liz.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. RMIT Business 2004Description: 26 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: August 2004 Saver Plus progress and perspectives : Evaluation of the Saver Plus pilot project : interim report (Cover title)Summary: This document is an interim report that will provide a progress review of the first stage of the Saver Plus program. We would like to acknowledge the assistance of the Saver Plus research reference group in providing valuable input, discussion and guidance. The participants who have joined the program between July 2003 and the end of March 2004 have provided the data included in the report. We are grateful for their willingness to be involved in the research. Staff who are implementing and running the program have also provided valuable information, we thank them for their time in participating in the research. The evaluation has been funded by ANZ and both ANZ and Brotherhood of St Laurence have provided significant background information useful for the research efforts.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).

Australian vocational education and training statistics : VET in schools [Website]

by National Centre for Vocational Education Research.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research Other title: VET in schools.Online Access: VET in Schools 2018 | Website Notes: PDF link to reports : VET in Schools 2018Summary: These publications relate to the VET in schools collection. Data submitted as part of the VET in schools collection are provided to the Ministerial Council for Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth Affairs (MCEECDYA) for inclusion in their annual report 'National Data on Participation in VET in Schools Programs'.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Hosted by Prosentient