Brotherhood of St Laurence

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Australia's refugee and special humanitarian program : current issues and future directions : views from the community sector. /

by Refugee Council of Australia.

Publisher: Glebe, N.S.W. Refugee Council of Australia 2004Description: 85 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: URL: 'http://www.refugeecouncil.org.au/docs/resources/submissions/2004-05_intakesub.pdf' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:28:32 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: (1)

The journey continues : a national conference on refugee women, April 4th & 5th, 1998. /

by Refugee Council of Australia.

Publisher: Glebe, N.S.W. Refugee Council of Australia 1998Description: unpaged.Notes: Cover title: The Refugee Council of Australia presents papers and proceedings from : The journey continues : a national conference on refugee women, April 4th & 5th, 1998. Sponsored by The Mercy Foundation & Transcultural Mental Health (NSW) Includes bibliographical references.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The size and composition of the 2000-2001 humanitarian program : views from the community sector. /

by Refugee Council of Australia.

Publisher: Glebe, N.S.W. Refugee Council of Australia 2001Description: 105 p.Notes: February 2000Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

How many refugees should come? /

by Rivett, Kenneth | Refugee Council of Australia.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Refugee Council of Australia 1987Description: 43 p.: Bibliography p. 40-43.Notes: Paper presented to a meeting of the Refugee Council of Australia at Red Cross House, Melbourne, on 4 November,1987.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Australian mentoring programs for refugee and humanitarian entrants. /

by Refugee Council of Australia.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Refugee Council of Australia 2005Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: URL: 'http://www.refugeecouncil.org.au/docs/current/mentoring.pdf' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:40:21 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success response School to work Into & out of work INTO AND OUT OF WORK SCHOOL TO WORKAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Empowering refugees : a good practice guide to humanitarian settlement. /

by Australia. Department of Immigration and Citizenship. Research.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T.The Department 2008Description: iv, 179 p.; ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Produced with assistance from Refugee Council of Australia (RCOA)Summary: "This guide presents government and non-government initiatives from around Australia, that assist humanitarian entrants to settle in Australia in the key areas of health, education, employment, law and community harmony as well as focusing on key client groups: youth, family and women. The guide is intended primarily to be a resource for community workers, other professionals and volunteers working in the field of humanitarian settlement. The grassroots good practice examples presented provide ideas and practical solutions for community and government organisations assisting refugees to settle in Australia. The guide is also intended to be a source of inspiration and information for government policy makers." -- DIaC website.Availability: (1)

Family reunion and Australia's refugee and humanitarian program : a discussion paper. /

by Refugee Council of Australia.

Publisher: Sydney, [N.S.W.] Refugee Council of Australia 2009Description: 13 p.Summary: Through annual community consultations, the Refugee Council of Australia (RCOA) has long identified family reunion as one of the top priorities for refugees and other humanitarian entrants. The need for families to be reunited is not only elucidated by refugees, as facilitating family reunion has been shown to have an impact on settlement through improvements in economic participation as well as the psychosocial wellbeing of refugees themselves. This discussion paper outlines some of the key issues and concerns with regard to how people settling in Australia through the refugee and humanitarian program are able to reunite with their families. This paper explores the impact of policy and processes around travel expense, definitions of family, extended separation, regional targets, split families, travel documents, health checks, settlement support for reunited families, migration advice and Special Humanitarian Program (SHP) visas on family reunion experiences. The paper also highlights key recommendations to move forward in addressing these concerns.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Amplifying the voices of young refugees. /

by Refugee Council of Australia.

Publisher: Sydney, [N.S.W.] Refugee Council of Australia 2009Description: 26 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Abridged report 2009 Report coordinator: Louise Olliff. Settlement Policy OfficerSummary: During 2008-09, the Refugee Council of Australia (RCOA) undertook a literature review and a series of youth consultations across three Australian states and the Australian Capital Territory, with the aim of developing a targeted and informed strategy for the ongoing engagement of refugee young people in advocating to have their needs and concerns addressed and ideas recognised at a national level. People aged less than 30 years on arrival now comprise the significant majority and a growing proportion of new arrivals to Australia under the Refugee and Humanitarian Program. This project is premised upon the belief that amplification of the voices of young refugees and humanitarian entrants within national forums, such as RCOA's own annual community consultations, will facilitate the development of advocacy strategies, policy recommendations and project initiatives that are informed by and responsive to the priorities of a key and currently underheard population. RCOA believes that this will in turn lead to the development of more sensitive public policies to address their concerns, while also positively influencing broader community understandings of the experiences and contributions of young refugees.Availability: (1)

Annual report. /

by Refugee Council of Australia.

Publisher: Surry Hills, N.S.W. Refugee Council of Australia 2009Description: pp.Notes: 2004-2005 ; 2005-2006 ; 2006-2007 ; 2007-2008 ; 2008-1009 incluides current and previously Audited Financial StatementsAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

A bridge to a new culture : promoting the participation of refugees in sporting activities /

by Refugee Council of Australia.

Publisher: Surry Hills, N.S.W. Refugee Council of Australia 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: This report draws together conclusions from research on the participation of refugees in sport and lessons learned from organisations which have developed innovative approaches. In doing so, RCOA's aim is to encourage sporting administrators, community organisations, settlement service providers and government agencies to examine options for involving recently-arrived refugees in sporting activities, thereby helping to build a healthier and more inclusive society.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Economic, civic and social contributions of refugees and humanitarian entrants : a literature review /

by Refugee Council of Australia.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Commonwealth of Australia 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Prepared by the Refugee Council of Australia for the Department of Immigration and Citizenship Bibliography : p. 57- 90 Released February 2010Summary: This literature review on the economic, social and civic contributions of refugees covers relevant national and international sources while also seeking to identify information gaps and recommend future avenues of research. This report highlights the entrepreneurial spirit and a strong commitment to education and volunteerism brought to Australia by the 740,000 refugee and humanitarian migrants settled since Federation. Researched and compiled by RCOA for the Department of Immigration and Citizenship, Economic, Civic and Social Contributions of Refugees and Humanitarian Entrants examines findings of 177 Australian and international research reports and articles. The 90-page report looks at the benefits of Australia's Refugee and Humanitarian Program, labour force and economic outcomes for former refugees, voluntary work among refugee communities, their contributions to Australian society and the educational and employment outcomes of their Australian-born children.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

What works : employment strategies for refugee and humanitarian entrants /

by Olliff, Louise | Refugee Council of Australia.

Publisher: Surry Hills, N.S.W. Refugee Council of Australia 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: The Refugee Council of Australia?s national research into sustainable employment pathways and refugee background communities. The overarching aim of this research has been to map, analyse and model solutions to the barriers that refugee entrants face in making the transition to meaningful, sustainable employment in Australia. What Works: Employment strategies for refugee and humanitarianentrants presents the findings from this investigation. Gaining stable, adequately-remunerated, fulfilling employment is a significant contributor towards successful resettlement for refugee and humanitarian entrants. Despite these entrants? eagerness to participate in the Australian workforce and the wealth of skills and experience that they bring to Australia, research has shown that former refugees are overrepresented among the ranks of underemployed, lowly-paid, low-skilled, precariously employed and casualised members of the labour force, and that they face many specific barriers to employment.Availability: (1)

Finding the right time and place : exploring post-compulsory education and training pathways for young people from refugee backgrounds in NSW /

by Olliff, Louise | Refugee Council of Australia.

Publisher: Surry Hills, N.S.W. Refugee Council of Australia 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: Between January 2004 and December 2008, 21% of the 19,839 refugee and humanitarian entrants who settled in NSW were aged between 16 and 25 at the time of their arrival, making young people of post-compulsory school age a significant demographic settling under the Refugee and Humanitarian Program. These young people bring with them a wealth of skills and experience but also face many challenges in making the transition to life in Australia, particularly with regards to their pursuit of education and training. Many refugee young people come from situations in which their schooling has been highly disrupted or, in some cases, they have not had the opportunity to attend school at all. ; Young people of post-compulsory school age can also face additional pressures, demands and stresses ; than those who migrate at a younger age. These include: more significant pressure to achieve educationally, less previous experience of education, higher level of family responsibilities, delayed or ; suspended personal development as a result of their refugee experience, and limited access to needed ; services due to the inflexibility of many youth and education systems based on chronological age (CMYI ; 2006a). ; Despite the challenges that newly arrived young people with a background of disrupted education face in adapting to the educational expectations and environments in Australia, many are extremely ; motivated and driven to pursue higher education, training and career goals. Research confirms much of the anecdotal evidence that young refugee and humanitarian entrants see education as a source of hope and future (Chegwidden & Thompson 2008; RCOA 2009).Availability: (1)

Australia's refugee and humanitarian program : community views on current challenges and future directions /

by Refugee Council of Australia.

Publisher: Surry Hills, N.S.W. Refugee Council of Australia from 2000 -Description: PDF.Other title: RCOA annual intake submission.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: 2000-01 ; 2001-02 ; 2002-03 ; 2003-04 ; 2004-05 ; 2005-06 ; 2006-07 ; 2007-08 ; 2008-09 ; 2009-10 ; 2010-11 ; 2011-12 ; 2012-13 ; 2013-14 ; 2014-15 ; 2015-16 ; 2017-18Summary: Each year, the Refugee Council of Australia (RCOA) invites people from across Australia to participate in its annual national consultations on the future of Australia's refugee and humanitarian program. These consultations inform RCOA's annual submission to the Minister for Immigration and Citizenship on issues the Australian Government should consider in planning the coming year's refugee program.Availability: (1)

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