Brotherhood of St Laurence

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New apprenticeship pathways : an option for associate professionals? . /

by Stanwick, John | Saunders, John.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2004Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.ncver.edu.au/research/core/cp0201.pdf' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:17:06 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Getting it right : responding to what employers and apprentices have to say about apprenticeships. /

by Toner, Phil.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Dusseldorp Skills Forum 2005Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.dsf.org.au/papers/179/DSF_Tonerdoc_web_0.pdf' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:27:30 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Vocational education and training in Australia, the United Kingdom and Germany . /

by Misko, Josie | National Centre for Vocational Education Research.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2006Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.ncver.edu.au/research/core/cp0306a.pdf' Checked: 22/04/2009 2:26:15 PM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Creating synergies : local government facilitating learning and development through partnerships. /

by Waterhouse, Peter | National Centre for Vocational Education Research | Virgona, Crina | Brown, Richard.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2006Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.ncver.edu.au/research/proj/nr4013.pdf' Checked: 22/04/2009 2:32:19 PM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseSummary: This report documents the evolution and development of four learning communities in Victoria where local government has been involved. It investigates the challenges and complexities faced in getting these communities off the ground and the role that the vocational education and training (VET) sector has played. The study has highlighted the importance of recognising different stakeholders values and perspectives, appreciating multiple outcomes, and proactively managing the relationships between various groups of stakeholders.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Financial management and young Australian workers /

by Dowling, Nicki | Hoiles, Lauren | Corney, Tim.

Publisher: 2008Availability: No items available

The Australian National Training Authority. /

by Australian National Training Authority.

Publisher: 08/18/2003 15:28:51http://www.anta.gov.au/ 2003Notes: Description based on contents viewed : 08/18/2003 Mode of access : WORLD WIDE WEB ONLINE RESOURCESummary: ANTA is a Commonwealth statutory authority developing national systems of vocational education and trainingAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

From the dual apprenticeship system to a dual labor market ? : the German high-skill equilibrium and the service economy. /

by Eichhorst, Werner | Institute for the Study of Labor | Marx, Paul.

Publisher: Bonn, Germany Institute for the Study of Labor 2009Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: Different models of protection against labor market risks are associated with diverging models of economic performance. Historically established institutional complementarities between labor market regulation, unemployment protection, and vocational training tend to mirror specific national models of economic production. For example, the German dual apprenticeship system is a core feature of the corporatist model of "diversified quality production". This, in turn, is supported via skills-protecting, earnings-related unemployment insurance, skills-oriented active labor market policies and strong dismissal protection so that long-term productive employment relationships become viable. The paper explores the connection between structural change and the development of skill creation in the German case with a particular focus on the difference between manufacturing and services as well as between different types of service sub-sectors. The paper takes manufacturing, a sector dominated by standard employment, as a reference point but mainly addresses different segments of the service economy: traditional ones (banking and insurance), new high-skill sectors (IT and the "creative economy") and growing areas of low-skill services (hotels and restaurants, cleaning). We find that dynamic job creation in these segments of the service sector was possible due to a less regulated institutional environment.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Historical time series of apprenticeships and traineeships in Australia from 1963 /

by National Centre for Vocational Education Research.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2010Description: HTML.Notes: 6 May 2010 Statistical report Microsoft Excel INTO AND OUT OF WORK SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: This time series presents a summary of training activity in apprenticeships and traineeships in Australia for the period 1963-2009. A timeline of major policy changes affecting apprenticeships and traineeships in Australia from 1901 to the present is provided to give the summary information context. The data tables which follow present in-training, commencement, completion, and cancellation/withdrawal figures by state and territory and trade occupation, separately, for the full period 1963-2009. For the period 1995-2009, more detailed information is provided, allowing for a comparison of training activity in trade and non-trade occupations. Finally, apprentice and trainee training rates are presented by occupation and state and territory for the period 1996-2009. In order to maintain consistency with historical source publications, figures on commencements, completions and cancellations/withdrawals are presented for the 12 months ending 30 June in all tables, while in-training figures refer to the number in-training as at 30 JuneAvailability: No items available

Creating a future direction for Australian vocational education and training : a discussion paper on the future of the VET system /

by Skills Australia.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Skills Australia 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: October 2010 Includes bibliographical references SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: Australia needs people to have more skills and to use them productively in the workplace. We also need higher rates of workforce participation. To help achieve these goals we need to increase demand from employers to take on and use these skills. This comes hand in hand with improving the depth, range and responsiveness of services the VET system provides. However, the uptake of training will not happen unless students, employers and the community have confidence in the quality and appropriateness of VET services and providers. This paper outlines a number of issues for discussion that can help set the direction Australian vocational education and training might take to achieve these objectives. Many of the issues will be familiar to those working in and with the sector. Skills Australia is keen to tap into this knowledge and experience to come up with workable solutions. We want to hear from people who use or have used the VET system- what are the directions the VET sector can take so it better meets your requirements?Availability: (1)

Pre-apprenticeships and their impact on apprenticeship completion and satisfaction /

by Karmel, Tom | National Centre for Vocational Education Research | Oliver, Damian.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: In this report, the authors concentrate on apprentices in trade occupations, where pre-apprenticeship programs are most prevalent. Approximately 28 per cent of apprentices and trainees in the trade occupations reported that they had completed a pre-apprenticeship program. This allows the authors to examine a number of questions about the impact of pre-apprenticeship training on the apprenticeship experience. First, they look at whether those who undertook pre-apprenticeship training were more satisfied with their apprenticeship than their peers who had not. Second, they look at whether those who undertook a pre-apprenticeship are more likely to complete their training. Thirdly, they examine whether those who undertook a pre-apprenticeship but who did not complete their apprenticeship are less likely to give work- or training-based factors as their reason for not completing their training. Our motivation is to determine whether the pre-apprenticeship training gives potential apprentices a more realistic idea of what an apprenticeship really is. (Introduction)Availability: (1)

Pre-apprenticeship training activity /

by Foley, Paul | National Centre for Vocational Education Research | Blomberg, Davinia.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: This research investigated pre-apprenticeship training in Australia through a variety of research methods?keyword searches, lists of prescribed pre-apprenticeship courses from state and territory contacts, and a unit record enrolment file. An analysis of this data found that there were ten nationally accredited and 24 training package courses with pre-apprenticeship activity. There were approximately 64 800 course enrolments in the identified pre-apprenticeship courses in 2009. This can be compared with 2007 when there were 50 700 course enrolments in these courses. The major findings were that over half of pre-apprenticeship course enrolments were within the engineering and related technologies field of education and around a third were within the architecture and building field; and the majority of course enrolments were within certificate II courses.Availability: (1)

Australian vocational education and training statistics : completion and attrition rates for apprentices and trainees 2010 /

by National Centre for Vocational Education Research.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: This publication presents completion and attrition rates for apprentices and trainees using three different methodologies : contract completion rates, individual completion rates - uses contract completion rates and adjusts this figure based on recommencement data and projected completion rates - based on a 'life tables' methodology for the latest commencing cohorts.Availability: (1)

Learning for Jobs : OECD Reviews of Vocational Education and Training, Australia /

by Hoeckel, Kathrin | Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development | Field, Simon | Justesen, Troy R | Kim, Moonhee.

Publisher: Paris, France OECD 2008Description: 59 p.Other title: A learning for jobs review of Australia 2008.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: November 2008 Bibliography : p. 45-49 INTO AND OUT OF WORK SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: This review of vocational education and training (VET) in Australia is part of 'Learning for Jobs', the OECD policy study of VET a programme of analytical work and individual country reviews designed to help countries make their VET systems more responsive to labour market needs. The review assesses the main challenges faced by the VET system and presents an interconnected package of policy recommendations, in terms of the challenge, the recommendation itself, supporting arguments and suggested aspects of implementation as well as potential resource implications. [Summary]Availability: (1)

Starting from scratch : teacher to researcher and back again /

by Clayton, Berwyn | National Centre for Vocational Education Research.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research (unpub.) 2012Description: PDF.Other title: National VET Research Conference (No Frills) 2011. Keynote.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: Berwyn Clayton has been involved in the VET sector for over 25 years. After beginning her career as a teacher, Berwyn became a pioneer in promoting the value of research. With a record of over 30 publications and 25 conference papers or journal articles, Berwyn has created an impressive body of knowledge, particularly in areas such as assessment and the capability of the VET workforce. Berwyn is also dedicated to supporting and mentoring new researchers, in particular those who were formerly VET practitioners, as she was. Berwyn is currently the Director of the Work-based Education Research Centre (WERC) at Victoria University. It was these attributes that saw Berwyn named VET Researcher of the Year, and give a keynote speech at the National Centre for Vocational Education Research's 2011 National VET Research Conference (No Frills). This speech provides an insight into Berwyn's journey into VET research and demonstrates her hallmark presentation style using pictures (chosen for their amusing as well as didactic impact) to guide us through the story. Her messages are directed at practitioner researchers.Availability: (1)

Understanding the psychological contract in apprenticeships and traineeships to improve retention /

by Smith, Erica | National Centre for Vocational Education Research | Walker, Arlene | Kemmis, Ros Brennan.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: This research examines the 'psychological contract' or the unwritten expectations of employers and employees in an employment relationship. The particular aim of this study was to discover whether mismatched expectations have any effect on retention in apprenticeships and traineeships. Overall, there was a very high level of agreement on the obligations of the two major parties and so mismatched expectations turn out not to be the explanation for high attrition rates. But paying greater attention to the areas perceived as deficient, such as employers providing specific time for training, fair treatment and resources to do the job, may be a means of improving retention.Availability: (1)

Rethinking apprenticeships /

by Dolphin, Tony (ed.) | Institute for Public Policy Research | Lanning, Tess (ed.).

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: November 2011 Bibliography : p. 117-119Summary: After a steep decline in the 1970s and 80s, apprenticeships have enjoyed something of a renaissance under recent Conservative, Labour and Coalition administrations. The Coalition government has pledged funding for an extra 250,000 apprenticeships over the course of this parliament. Apprenticeships are seen as important to both economic growth and social justice. They are a tool to replenish the workforce with a generation of skilled workers. They also offer young people the chance to gain relevant occupational skills and provide a route into employment. As such, they have been a central response to the disappearing youth labour market over the past three decades.Availability: (1)

How well do our entry level training models fit the labour market of the 1990s ? /

by Sweet, Richard.

Publisher: unpub. 1996Description: 15 leaves.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

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