Brotherhood of St Laurence

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TAFE funding and the education targets : a paper discussing recent trends in public funding for VET and TAFE and the implications for future funding of government targets to improve the skills of the Australian /

by Long, Michael | Monash University. Centre for the Economics of Education & raining (CEET).

Publisher: Clayton, Vic. Monash University. Centre for the Economics of Education & Training (CEET) 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: March 2010 Includes bibiographical referencesSummary: This paper discusses recent trends in public funding for VET and TAFE and the implications for future funding of government targets to improve the skills of the Australian population. The paper is motivated by the apparent increase in VET provision implied by government educational attainment targets in the context of stable or declining funding for VET and the conclusion that funding needs to increase if the targets are to be met.Availability: (1)

A qualitative study of apprenticeship pay: an ippr report to the Low Pay Commission /

by Lawton, Kayte | Institute for Public Policy Research | Norris, Emma.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: January 2010 Bibliography : p. 61 SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: Although most apprentices are employed, the majority are exempt from UK National Minimum Wage legislation, and pay rates for apprentices vary significantly across different industries and by gender and age. The Low Pay Commission (LPC) has been asked by Government to consider how apprentice pay could be brought under the National Minimum Wage framework. This report, commissioned by the Low Pay Commission, examines variations in apprentice pay across the UK and the role of apprentice pay in young people?s decisions to start and complete an apprenticeship. The report also considers the potential responses of employers to the introduction of a national minimum wage for apprentices.Availability: (1)

The impact of wages on the probability of completing an apprenticeship or traineeship /

by Karmel, Tom | National Centre for Vocational Education Research | Mlotkowski, Peter.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2010Description: PDF.Other title: National Centre for Vocational Education Research monograph.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 36 INTO AND OUT OF WORK SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: Making use of the NCVER Apprentice and Trainee Destination Survey, this paper focuses on wages and the impact they have on the decision not to continue with an apprenticeship or traineeship. The broad conclusion is that increasing training wages would have little effect on completion rates. For apprentices, it is the premium associated with becoming a tradesperson that counts, not training wages. For females in non-trade traineeships, there is no relationship between wages and completion rates. It is only for males in non-trade traineeships for whom increasing training wages would make a difference to completion rates. However, for this group there is, on average, only a modest premium to completion. This finding raises the question of whether traineeships in some occupations, sales for example, are contributing to increased skill levels in any substantive manner.Availability: (1)

The impact of wages and the likelihood of employment on the probability of completing an apprenticeship or traineeship /

by Karmel, Tom | National Centre for Vocational Education Research | Mlotkowski, Peter.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 35Summary: This paper updates an earlier paper by Karmel and Mlotkowski and looks at how the probability of getting a job, in addition to wages, impacts on completion rates. It finds that for trade apprentices the premium (or extra wage completing an apprenticeship brings) attached to becoming a tradesperson is a significant factor, whereas for non-trade trainees the training wage matters more. It also finds that the probability of employment for an apprentice or trainee on completion is greater than if they drop out; this particularly affects completion rates for trades and females in non-trade occupations. Finally, the economic downturn significantly increased the attractiveness of apprenticeships and traineeships.Availability: (1)

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