Brotherhood of St Laurence

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OECD Economic Surveys : Australia /

by Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Publisher: Paris, France OECD 1972 -Description: Various volumes.Online Access: Website Notes: Annual series publication 1999-2000 ; 2000-2001 ; 2003-2004 ; 2004 ; 2006 ; 2008 ; 2010 ; 2012 ; 2014 ; 2017 ; 2018 ; 2021 Publications also available to read online. Summary: OECD’s periodic surveys of the Australian economy. Each edition surveys the major challenges faced by the country, evaluates the short-term outlook, and makes specific policy recommendations. Special chapters take a more detailed look at specific challenges. Extensive statistical information is included in charts and graphs. [Publisher website]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (10).

Annual leave in Australia : an analysis of entitlement, usage and preferences. /

by Denniss, R.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. The Australia Institute 2003Notes: July 2002 Bibliography: p. 29-31Availability: No items available

Labour force experience, Australia /

by Australian Bureau of Statistics.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic.Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) catalogue no. 6206.0 1994 -Description: pp.Notes: ABS 6206.0 1994 ; 1997 ; 1999 ; 2001 ; 2003 ; 2005 ; 2007 ; 2009 ; 2011 INTO AND OUT OF WORK SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: This publication presents information about the labour force experience of persons aged 15 years and over during the 12 months ending February 2011. It presents information about time spent in labour force activities, including episodes of working or looking for work, and time spent out of the labour force. ; The statistics in this publication were compiled from data collected in the Labour Force Experience Survey conducted throughout Australia in February 2011 as a supplement to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) monthly Labour Force Survey (LFS). ; For this publication, labour force activity over a 12-month period was determined from a more limited set of questions than is used in the monthly Labour Force Survey (LFS). For this reason, the terms worked and looked for work are used, rather than the more precisely defined terms employed and unemployed, as used in the LFS. In this survey, the concepts worked and looked for work are used to determine whether a person was in the labour force during the year. Therefore, this concept is also based on a more limited set of questions than the Labour Force Survey. ; Labour force experience relates to a person's labour force activities over a 12-month period. Labour force activity consists of either working or looking for work. ; This survey measured the number of weeks in which persons were engaged in these labour force activities during the year, the number of spells of looking for work during the year and the main activity of persons when not in the labour force -- ABS websiteAvailability: No items available

Australian vocational education and training : research messages 2005 /

by National Centre for Vocational Education Research.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2006Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: Research messages 2005 is a collection of summaries on all research projects published or completed by the National Centre for Vocational Education Research in 2005. The summaries are clustered under five broad themes used by NCVER to organise all of its VET research and analysis: Industry and employers; Students and individuals; Teaching and learning; VET system; and VET in context. Forty-two pieces of work are included and each summary provides details of how to access the full research report.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Competing with dad : changes in the intergenerational distribution of male labour market income. /

by Gregory, R.G.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Centre for Economic Policy Research 1999Description: 19 p.Notes: Revised version of a paper presented at the Conference : Income support, Labour Markets and Behaviour : A Research Agenda, 24-25 November 1998 Australian National University, Canberra.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The statistical evidence for offshore outsourcing and its impact on the Australian labour force /

by Woods, Guy | Australia. Department of Parliamentary Services. arliamentary Library.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Department of the Parliamentary Library 2007Description: HTML.Notes: URL: 'http://www.aph.gov.au/library/pubs/rp/2007-08/08rp03.htm' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:47:07 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success response Into & out of work INTO AND OUT OF WORKAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Australian labour market statistics /

by Australian Bureau of Statistics.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T.Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) catalogue no. 6105.0 2010Description: HTML.Notes: 2003 ; 2004 ; 2005 ; 2006 ; 2007 ; 2008 INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: "Australian Labour Market Statistics, produced quarterly, brings together a range of ABS labour statistics to present a statistical summary of the Australian labour market. It has been developed primarily as a reference document, and provides a broad basis for labour analysis and research. In addition to data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS), this publication contains statistics from a range of other ABS labour surveys including Average Weekly Earnings, the Labour Price Index, Job Vacancies, Employment and Earnings - Public Sector, and Industrial Disputes. The publication also includes summary data from recently released labour force supplementary surveys and international data for selected labour market indicators." -- [Publisher website]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Australian labour force /

by Australian Bureau of Statistics.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T.Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) catalogue no. 6202.0 2011Description: HTML.Notes: 1993 ; 1994 ; 1995 ; 1996 ; 1997 ; 1998 ; 1999 ; 2000 ; 2001 ; 2002 ; 2003 ; 2004 ; 2005 ; 2006 ; 2007 ; 2008 ; 2009 ; 2010 ; 2011 INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: "Summary results of the monthly Labour Force Survey containing estimates of employed and unemployed persons classified by sex, full-time/part-time status, states and territories and some age groups; and persons not in the labour force. was published as Labour Force, Australia, Preliminary until March 2003. As the publication had provided final summary data for a number of years to that point, the misleading qualification preliminary was removed from the April 2003 issue onwards." -- ABS website.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey /

by University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research.

Publisher: Parkville, Vic. University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2010Summary: The Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (or HILDA) Survey is a national household-based panel survey, which aims to tracks all members of a sample of Australian households over time and investigate economic and subjective well-being, labour market dynamics and family dynamics.Availability: No items available

Labour price index, Australia . /

by Australian Bureau of Statistics.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian Bureau of Statistics 2008Description: HTML.Notes: URL: 'http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/mf/6345.0' Checked: 2/03/2009 9:55:51 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success response 1997 ; 1998 ; 1999 ; 2000 ; 2001 ; 2002 ; 2003 ; 2004 ; 2005 ; 2006 ; 2007 ; 2008Summary: "The Labour Price Index measures changes in the price of labour services resulting from market pressures, and is unaffected by changes in the quality or quantity of work performed. It is unaffected by changes in the composition of the labour force, hours worked, or changes in characteristics of employees (e.g. work performance). Information about the wage price indexes has been released for each quarter since September 1997. Individual indexes are published for various combinations of state and territory, public and private sectors, and broad industry groups." -- ABS website.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Keeping Australia's older workers in the labour force. A policy perspective. /

by Walter, Maggie | Jackson, Natalie | Felmingham, Bruce.

Publisher: 2008Availability: No items available

Families, incomes and jobs, volume 4 : a statistical report on waves 1 to 6 of the HILDA survey /

by Wilkins, Roger | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied conomic and Social Research | Warren, Diana | Hahn, Markus.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2009Description: vii, 208 p. : ill.Other title: Fourth Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: HOUSEHOLD, INCOME AND LABOUR DYNAMICS IN AUSTRALIA SURVEY (HILDA) The HILDA Survey is funded by the Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs Includes bibliographical references 17 Aug 2011 : Missing - needs call number change to 306.850994 FAMSummary: Commenced in 2001, the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey is a nationally representative panel study of Australian households. The study is funded by the Australian Government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) and is managed by the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research at the University of Melbourne. Roy Morgan Research has conducted the fieldwork since Wave 9 (2009), prior to which The Nielsen Company was the fieldwork provider. This is the eighth volume of the Annual Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey, examining data from the first ten waves of the study, which were conducted between 2001 and 2010. ; The HILDA Survey seeks to provide longitudinal data on the lives of Australian residents. It annually collects information on a wide range of aspects of life in Australia, including household and family relationships, employment, education, income, expenditure, health and wellbeing, attitudes and values on a variety of subjects, and various life events and experiences. [Extract from Introduction]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Google econometrics and unemployment forecasting . /

by Askitas, Nikos | Institute for the Study of Labor | Zimmermann, Klaus F.

Publisher: Bonn, Germany Institute for the Study of Labor 2009Notes: INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: The current economic crisis requires fast information to predict economic behavior early, which is difficult at times of structural changes. This paper suggests an innovative new method of using data on internet activity for that purpose. It demonstrates strong correlations between keyword searches and unemployment rates using monthly German data and exhibits a strong potential for the method used.Availability: No items available

The labour market effects of vocational education and training in Australia /

by Lee, Wang-Sheng | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied conomic and Social Research | Coelli, Michael B.

Publisher: Parkville, Vic. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2010Description: 43 p. : ill.Other title: Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: January 2010 Bibliography ; p. 42-43 SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: This report provides estimates of the effects of completing a Vocational Education and Training (VET) qualification on several labour market outcomes: earnings from employment, plus the probabilities of being employed, being employed full-time if employed, and being employed in a permanent position. Estimates are provided for 1993, 1997, 2001 and 2005. The estimation methodology is based on matched comparisons of persons at each level of VET qualifications separately with Year 12 completers and non-completers. Compared to Year 12 completers, there is little benefit from obtaining certificate level qualifications, but there are positive employment and earnings outcomes associated with obtaining diploma level qualifications. Compared to non-completers of Year 12, however, there are benefits from obtaining any kind of VET qualification, including the lower level Certificate I/II qualifications.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The effects of macroeconomic conditions on the education and employment outcomes of youth /

by Hérault, Nicolas | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research | Kostenko, Weiping | Marks, Gary | Zakirova, Rezida.

Publisher: Parkville, Vic. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2010Description: 29 p. : ill.Other title: Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: March 2010 SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: This paper examines the impact of macroeconomic conditions on the education and employment outcomes of youths in school-to-work transition. The dataset is based on five different cohorts from the Youth in Transition surveys (YIT) and the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) and covers the period from 1985 to 2006, which is long enough to control explicitly for both poor and positive macroeconomic conditions. The multivariate analyses show that both the unemployment rates, and to a lesser extent economic growth rates, have an impact on youths? education and employment outcomes. Although the effects vary significantly by gender and education level, overall the results reveal that poor macroeconomic conditions tend to drive young people out of full-time work and into inactivity or part-time work. In addition, poor macroeconomic conditions tend to discourage further education. A result worth noticing is that males who did not complete secondary school suffer the largest increase in unemployment risks as the unemployment rate increases.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The incidence and wage effects of overskilling among employed VET graduates /

by Mavromaras, Kostas | National Centre for Vocational Education Research | McGuinness, Seamus | King Fok, Yin.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 31 SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: When the skills workers have do not match the skills that jobs require, a number of negative labour market outcomes can occur, including productivity and efficiency losses, lowered earnings and reduced job satisfaction. Using data from the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey, this study examines the degree of job mismatch experienced by workers. The mismatch between the perceived skill level of the worker and the skill level of the job is considered as overskilling. The report finds that workers with vocational qualifications, particularly at the certificate III or IV level, are less likely to experience overskilling.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

How Responsive is Female Labour Supply to Child Care Costs - New Australian Estimates /

by Gong, Xiaodong | Australia. The Treasury | Breunig, Robert | King, Anthony.

Publisher: Parkes, A.C.T. Australia. The Treasury 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: April 2010 INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: The degree of responsiveness of Australian women's labour supply to child care cost has been a matter of some debate. There is a view that the level of responsiveness is very low or negligible, running counter to international and anecdotal evidence. In this paper we review the Australian and international literature on labour supply and child care, and provide improved Australian estimates of labour supply elasticities and child care demand elasticities with respect to gross child care price. We find that the limited literature in Australia has suffered from measurement error problems stemming in large part from shortcomings with data on child care price and child care usage. We use detailed child care data from three recent waves of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey (covering the period 2005 to 2007) to address these problems. We extend the standard labour supply and child care model to allow for separate effects of different child care prices for children in different age ranges and we calculate regional child care prices based upon child level information. The salient finding is that child care prices do have statistically significant effects on mothers' labour supply and child care demand. The new estimates are in line with international findings, and their robustness is supported by a validation exercise involving an alternative technique and an earlier time period.Availability: (1)

Mental health and labour market participation : evidence from IV Panel Data Models /

by Frijters, Paul | Institute for the Study of Labor | Johnston, David W | Shields, Michael A.

Publisher: Bonn, Germany Institute for the Study of Labor 2010Description: PDF.Other title: Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA). Discussion paper.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: April 2010 Bibliography : p. 18-19 INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: A large body of empirical research links mental health and labour market outcomes; however, there are few studies that effectively control for the two-way causality between work and health and the existence of unobserved individual characteristics that might jointly determine health and labour market outcomes. In this study, we estimate the effect of mental health on labour market participation using various models, including instrumental variable models that exploit individual variation observed in panel data. We find robust evidence that a reduction in mental health has a substantial negative impact on the probability of actively participating in the labour market. We calculate that a one standard deviation decrease in mental health decreases the probability of participation by around 17 percentage points. This effect is larger for females and for older individuals. We therefore provide robust evidence that there are substantial costs due to the lost productivity resulting from poor mental health.Availability: (1)

Benchmarking working Europe /

by European Trade Union Institute.

Publisher: Brussels European Trade Union Institute 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 109-114 INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: This year's Benchmarking Working Europe report embarks upon a social stocktaking of the reaction to and impact of the financial, economic and social crisis as a means of feeding into the post-crisis and EU2020 debate. The indicators presented in this year's Benchmarking Working Europe reveal that the progress in growth and employment over the past growth cycle has been practically wiped out in the course of the past year: the EU average employment rate is back to its 2006 level, while unemployment has increased by two percentage points in a single year. Yet the impact of the economic crisis on labour markets displays considerable variation from one country to another.Availability: (1)

How Does a Worker's Labour Market History Affect Job Duration? /

by Borland, Jeff | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied conomic and Social Research | Johnston, David.

Publisher: Parkville, Vic. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2010Description: PDF.Other title: Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: May 2010 Bibliography : p. 18-19 INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: This study explores the relation between a worker's job duration and prior labour market experience. Hazard models are estimated using data on employment spells for the population aged 25 to 64 years in Australia from the HILDA survey (waves 1 to 7). A worker?s labour force state immediately preceding an employment spell is found to have a significant effect on the likelihood of exit from employment, as well as the exit destination and whether the exit is involuntary. In particular, previously being unemployed or having experienced involuntary separation from a job is associated with worse subsequent employment outcomes. To develop further insights into the role of labour market history a hazard model for exit from unemployment is also estimated, and the results contrasted with those from the employment model.Availability: (1)

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