Brotherhood of St Laurence

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Have school vocational education and training programs been successful ? /

by Anlezark, Alison | National Centre for Vocational Education Research | Karmel, Tom | Ong, Koon.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2006Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.ncver.edu.au/research/core/cp0302.pdf' Checked: 22/04/2009 2:23:58 PM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseSummary: This report investigates whether these school vocational education and training (VET) programs provide successful outcomes for participants, in terms of retention to Year 12 (or its vocational equivalent) and full-time engagement with employment or learning.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

What is working in good schools in remote indigenous communities ? /

by Storry, Kirsten.

Publisher: St. Leonards, N.S.W. The Centre for Independent Studies 2007Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Educational outcomes of children on guardianship or custody orders : a pilot study. /

by Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2007Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.aihw.gov.au/publications/cws/eoocogoco/eoocogoco.pdf' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:42:09 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success response Family & early yearsAvailability: No items available

Submission to the MCEETYA consultation on the National Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Kamp, Annelies.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.), 2008Description: 11 p. PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: The Brotherhood welcomes the reiteration of the collective responsibility for young people’s education and, in particular, the commitment of a new level of collaboration between all Australian governments in ensuring enhanced educational outcomes for all young Australians. We suggest that a commitment to enhanced intergovernmental collaboration is a necessary first step that will enable other stakeholders, including parents, communities and business, to contribute to improved educational attainment for all young people. In particular, there is a compelling need, as a priority in the post-compulsory years, for new funding models that align with current policy objectives. While schools will often recognise the need for a given young person to learn outside a school setting, some schools, particularly those in disadvantaged areas, are not able to ‘let go’ of sufficient student funding without compromising their staff/teacher ratios. This is an area for unprecedented intergovernmental agreement and action. We also strongly endorse the reframing of the National Declaration and, in particular, the recognition that in the current environment education rather than schooling is the key imperative. We welcome the move away from notions of teaching and curriculum to notions of learners who are also workers and community members and the need to be prepared for each of these roles. However, in establishing a goal for young Australians to be able to accept responsibility for their own actions (p.5), the government must not move the burden of responsibility for success to young people, some of whom are already dealing with major structural barriers and material deprivations that result from decisions of others and that profoundly affect their ability to act. The draft Declaration rightly elevates the attention given to supporting young Australians in becoming active and informed citizens. As noted in our submission on the establishment of an Australian Youth Forum (Brotherhood of St Laurence 2008), children and young people have a right to participate in the decisions that affect them, in accordance with Article 12 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. Beyond this right, in the context of globalisation it is imperative that education focuses not only on the development of young people’s identity as worker but also on their identity as citizen. Historically, this focus on the worker/citizen has been a central concern of education systems; yet this balance has since the 1980s been skewed to focus on young people’s future worker identity (Seddon 2008). In a context of increasing diversity and inequality, the Brotherhood strongly endorses an enhanced focus on young people becoming active, informed citizens. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1), BSL Archives (1).

Trends shaping education [Website]/ OECD

by Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Publisher: Paris, France Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development 2008 -Description: pp. col . ill.Online Access: Website Summary: This book, published every two to three years, is designed to give policy makers, researchers, educational leaders, administrators and teachers a robust, non-specialist source to inform strategic thinking and stimulate reflection on the challenges facing education, whether in schools, universities or programmes for older adults.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Expanding choice in elementary and secondary education : a report on rethinking the federal role in education /

by Greene, Jay | The Brookings Institution | Loveless, Tom | MacLeod, W. Bentley.

Publisher: Washington, DC Brown Center on Education Policy, Brookings Institution 2010Description: 31 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: February 2, 2010 Bibliography p. 28-31Summary: "Education choice exercises a powerful pull on parents of school children: In the US, twenty-four percent report that they moved to their current neighborhood so their children could attend their current school; 15 percent of public school students attend parent-selected rather than district-assigned schools; the charter school and homeschooling sectors have grown from nothing to 2.6 percent and 3 percent of total enrollment respectively; private schools capture 11 percent of enrollment; and virtual schooling is poised for explosive growth. Consistent with these behavioral manifestations of the desire of parents to choose their children?s schools, schools of choice consistently generate more positive evaluations from parents than assigned schools."Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

A taste for learning : evaluating a pre-Community VCAL program

by Myconos, George | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2010Description: viii, 28 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 27-28Summary: This report evaluates a pre-Community VCAL 'Taster' course offered at the Brotherhood of St Laurence's Frankston High Street Centre. The course engaged young people who were seriously disaffected with mainstream secondary school education, and who were facing their transition to adulthood without having acquired important skills. It provided valuable literacy, numeracy, vocational and social skills tuition, as well as the experience these students needed to make judgments about continuing vocational or further education. ; VICTORIAN CERTIFICATE OF APPLIED LEARNING (VCAL)Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Indigenous education 2010 /

by Hughes, Helen | Centre for Independent Studies | Hughes, Mark.

Publisher: St Leonards, NSW Centre for Independant Studies 2010Description: vii, 29 p.: ill. charts, graphs.Other title: CIS Policy Monograph 110.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: The 2009 NAPLAN results for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students again show high rates of failure to meet the national minimum standards. Failure rates of 40 to 50% are common in Indigenous schools and rise to more than 70% in the Northern Territory. If schools are ranked by NAPLAN results, almost all the bottom 150 schools in such a notional list are Indigenous schools. There are few non-Indigenous schools in this bottom grouping and only a few Indigenous schools above this grouping. About 20,000 of Australia's 150,000 Indigenous students are enrolled in these Indigenous schools.Availability: (1)

Accountability and the public purposes of education /

by Reid, Alan.

Publisher: Australian Education Union 2009Description: 7 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: "This paper frames MySchool as an accountability strategy in the context of the purposes of education. The presenters reason for doing this is because the debate about MySchool has largely been conducted in the absence of an articulated set of reference points - that is claims and counter claims about the importance or the consequences of MySchool are often made in a vacuum. That they are self evidently good or bad. The paper argues that the reference point against which such judgments should be made is the public purposes of education. Professor Alan Reid is Emeritus Professor, Division of Education, Arts and Social Sciences, School of Education, University of South Australia. This paper was presented at a national symposium in Sydney, entitled, Advice for Ministers and ACARA on NAPLAN, the use of Student Data, My School and League Tables" APO WeeklyAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

From participation to leadership : evaluation of the Community Service Leadership Program

by Boese, Martina | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2010Description: ix, 32 p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Bibliography : p. 31-32 Summary: The Community Service Leadership Program (CSLP), developed by the Brotherhood of St Laurence and the Rotary Club of Melbourne, enabled disadvantaged young people in alternative educational settings to explore, devise and implement projects to benefit their local community. Evaluation by BSL researchers indicated that the model achieved positive outcomes for students (from increased communication and work-related skills to greater understanding of social issues), for teachers (in applying a pedagogy which fostered student initiative and interaction with the community) and for community organisations (in mutual respect between age-groups and between cultural groups).Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).

Links between literacy and numeracy skills and labour market outcomes /

by Shomos, Anthony | Australia. Productivity Commission.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Productivity Commission 2010Description: viii, 78 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 75-78Summary: Literacy and numeracy skills are one component of a person's human capital, and the focus of research in this paper. While raising educational attainment has been a longstanding goal of governments, more recently governments have focussed their attention on improving literacy and numeracy outcomes. For example, the Victorian Government's plan to improve literacy and numeracy skills aims to 'increase the proportion of young people meeting basic literacy and numeracy standards, and improve overall levels of achievement' To assist with achieving this goal, the National Assessment Plan - Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) has been established, which includes reporting results on the literacy and numeracy levels of students in years 3, 5, 7 and 9, and how they have changed over time.Availability: (1)

Education today 2010 : the OECD perspective /

by Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Publisher: Paris, France OECD Publications 2010Description: 86 p. : ill.Online Access: OECD iLibrary (Read only) Summary: What does the OECD have to say about the state of education today? What are the main OECD messages on early childhood education, teacher policies and tertiary education? What about student performance, educational spending and equity in education? OECD work on these important education topics and others have been brought together in a single accessible source updating the first edition of Education Today which came out in March 2009. Organised into eight chapters, this report examines early childhood education, schooling, transitions beyond initial education, higher education, adult learning, outcomes and returns, equity, and innovation. The chapters are structured around key findings and policy directions emerging from recent OECD educational analyses. Each entry highlights the main message in a concise and accessible way, with a brief explanation and reference to the original OECD source. This report will prove to be an invaluable resource for all those interested in the broad international picture of education, as well as for those wanting to know more about OECD work in this important domain.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

An investigation of TAFE efficiency /

by Fieger, Peter | National Centre for Vocational Education Research | Karmel, Tom | Stanwick, John.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 21Summary: Governments are interested in the relative efficiency of institutions, and in addition, information on efficiency can be used by individual institutions to benchmark themselves against their peers. The main factor that was found to affect efficiency, as defined in this paper, was degree of remoteness. Further, institute size is an important factor, with smaller institutes tending to be less efficient. This paper employs a mathematical technique known as Data Envelopment Analysis to examine the efficiency of TAFE institutes.Availability: (1)

Review of NCVER building researcher capacity initiative /

by Bartram, Ashlea | National Centre for Vocational Education Research | Stanwick, John | Loveder, Phil.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: In mid-2010 NCVER undertook a review of its building researcher capacity initiative in order to inform its direction into the future. The review found that the initiative had achieved a high profile among vocational education and training (VET) practitioners. The scholarship programs had heightened awareness about the role research can play in fostering good practice and a culture of evaluation. The review found, however, that more work needs to be done to find the best ways to encourage new VET researchers within universities.Availability: (1)

Building the foundations : outcomes from the adult language, literacy and numeracy search conference /

by National Centre for Vocational Education Research.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: 9 March 2011Summary: The importance of adult language, literacy and numeracy for greater workforce participation, productivity and social inclusion are well recognised, with both national and international research demonstrating the benefits of increasing proficiency for both individuals and communities. But there are still more questions to be answered, such as what is the extent of adult language, literacy and numeracy provision in Australia, and whose responsibility is it to fund such provision in the workplace? In September 2010, NCVER hosted a forum on behalf of the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations to explore these questions and what needs to be done to find the answers. This paper presents a summary of those discussions and recommendations for future action.Availability: (1)

The economic benefits of high-quality early childhood programs : what makes the difference? /

by Galinsky, Ellen | Families and Work Institute.

Publisher: Washington, DC Committee for Economic Development 2006Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: February 2006 Bibliography : pp. 27-28Summary: The early childhood field is deeply indebted to three studies of high-quality early education programs that began in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s and have continued to the present time - the High/Scope Perry Preschool Project, the Abecedarian Project, and the Chicago Child-Parent Centers (CPC)- because these studies provide strong evidence of the economic benefits of early childhood education as an economic investment. This paper is written in response to the tendency of a number of people to use the findings from these three studies to justify any and all early childhood programs without trying to extrapolate what these three studies specifically did that made a difference in affecting children in such dramatic ways. Even those who argue for high quality are likely to mean very different things when they use these words. This paper reflects an effort to determine what exactly about these three early childhood programs made them so successful, relying, in part, on interviews with the principal investigators of the programs.Availability: (1)

Visible learning : a synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement /

by Hattie, John.

Publisher: London Routledge 2009Description: ix, 378 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.Notes: Includes bibliographical references. Contents : 1. The challenge -- 2. The nature of the evidence: a synthesis of meta-analyses -- 3. The argument: visible teaching and visible learning -- 4. The contributions from the student -- 5. The contributions from the home -- 6. The contributions from the school -- 7. The contributions from the teacher -- 8. The contributions from the curricula -- 9. The contributions from teaching approaches - part I -- 10. The contributions from teaching approaches - part II -- 11. Bringing it all together -- App. A. The meta-analyses by topic -- App. B. The meta-analyses by rank orderSummary: This unique and ground-breaking book is the result of 15 years research and synthesises over 800 meta-analyses on the influences on achievement in school-aged students. It builds a story about the power of teachers, feedback, and a model of learning and understanding. The research involves many millions of students and represents the largest ever evidence based research into what actually works in schools to improve learning. Areas covered include the influence of the student, home, school, curricula, teacher, and teaching strategies. A model of teaching and learning is developed based on the notion of visible teaching and visible learningAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

A path to re-engagement : evaluating the first year of a Community VCAL education program for young people

by Myconos, George | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2011Description: viii, 47 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF | Summary Notes: Includes "A path to re-engagement : evaluating the first year of a Community VCAL education program for young people : research summary."Summary: In Frankston, the Brotherhood of St Laurence has developed a Community VCAL program tailored for young people aged 15 to 18 who have experienced barriers to mainstream education. Students undertake the Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning - a Years 11 and 12 course which combines classroom tuition with vocational training and work placements - in a community setting rather than in a school. The evaluation of the inaugural year found that, notwithstanding some challenges, the program made a significant difference to the educational opportunities of most of its students. ; VICTORIAN CERTIFICATE OF APPLIED LEARNING (VCAL)Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Overcoming barriers to education : Peninsula Youth Connections evaluation stage 1 report

by Bond, Sharon | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2011Description: ix, 61 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy | Summary Notes: Front cover: Peninsula Youth Connections is a partnership between the Brotherhood of St Laurence and TaskForce.; Includes " Overcoming barriers to education: Peninsula Youth Connections evaluation stage 1 summary." Summary: Peninsula Youth Connections (PYC) is the local expression of an intensive case management program funded by the Australian Government for young people at risk of disengaging from education or training. Operating in the Frankston and Mornington Peninsula region south-east of Melbourne, PYC also includes re-engagement activities for young people, and seeks to build the capacity of local youth services. The purpose of this evaluation is threefold: to identify the unmet needs which act as barriers to young people's participation in education; to signal the broader systemic factors which impede young people's learning; and to use the PYC as a case study to reflect on the Youth Connection model's advantages, constraints and opportunities for development.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Investing in our future : an evaluation of the national rollout of the Home Interaction Program for Parents and Youngsters (HIPPY) : final report to the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, August 2011 /

by Liddell, Max | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Barnett, Tony | Roost, Fatoumata Diallo | McEachran, Juliet.

Edition: 2nd ed.Publisher: [Fitzroy, Vic.] HIPPY Australia and Brotherhood of St Laurence 2011Description: xii, 130 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: August 2011 "A summary report from the national evaluation of the Home Interaction Program for Parents and Youngsters (HIPPY)"; August 2011Summary: A national evaluation of the Home Interaction Program for Parents and Youngsters (HIPPY), a combined home and centre-based early childhood enrichment program that supports parents in their role as their child's first teacher has found significant benefits for parents and children. The effectiveness of HIPPY was evaluated by means of a two-year, longitudinal, quasi-experimental research design that involved a comparison group drawn from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children using propensity score matching.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).

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