Brotherhood of St Laurence

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An investigation of the challenges facing African refugee communities in the Australian workforce : findings from a qualitative study of Sudanese and Liberian refugees in South Australia /

by Atem, Paul Gal | The Australian Sociological Association.

Publisher: unpub. 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Conference paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference. Social Causes, Private Lives (2010 : North Ryde, N.S.W.) INTO AND OUT OF WORKAvailability: (1)

The stranger who comes today and leaves after tomorrow : an analysis of current concerns with migrants' and refugees' regional settlement and mobility /

by Boese, Martina | The Australian Sociological Association.

Publisher: unpub. 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Conference paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference. Social Causes, Private Lives (2010 : North Ryde, N.S.W.)Summary: The regional migration and settlement of migrants and refugees is an issue that concerns a wide range of actors beyond the migrating subjects themselves. These include policy makers involved in the management of migration, state governments seeking to address regional labour shortages and demographic decline, so-called host communities responding to newcomers, and local businesses in demand of compliant labour. These diverse agents tend to share a general interest in the attraction and largely also the retention of migrants or refugees. A closer analysis reveals the diverse expectations of migrants and refugees that inform the concerns of non-migrant, non-refugee actors with migrants? and refugees? settlement and mobility. This paper explores regional migrant and refugee settlement, relevant policy rationales and the existing research on these forms of settlement with a focus on interests and perspectives on regional settlers held in the so-called host society. It suggests that these interests and specific perspectives on the ?stranger? are indicative of a currently prevailing understanding and governmental framing of a multicultural Australia based on migration management.Availability: (1)

Language, ideas and policy : insights from the periphery /

by Bowman, Dina | The Australian Sociological Association.

Publisher: unpub. (Brotherhood of St Laurence) 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Conference paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference. Social Causes, Private Lives (2010 : North Ryde, N.S.W.)Summary: In this paper I draw parallels between my initial encounters with the jargon and assumptions of employment services policy and the treatment of 'invalid' survey responses. My early encounters with the language of employment services policy highlighted the challenge researchers and analysts face in seeking to change how policy conversations are framed. That is, if we do not use language that has currency within a field we may not be heard or understood. Such language may incorporate assumptions that are at odds with the understandings and analyses that we wish to promote, but if we resist and avoid using accepted terminology we may be cast as illegitimate or irrelevant. This process of marginalisation is similar to the way in which unorthodox responses of research participants may be disregarded or considered invalid. In this paper, I emphasise the importance of looking at marginal perspectives - those understandings external to the dominant frame within which policy or research is shaped and analysed. I suggest that the identification of the processes by which some voices are heard, while others are excluded and marginalised is a key part of understanding the nature of policy frames and of shifting or reshaping them.Availability: (1)

The Global Financial Crisis in Australia /

by Chesters, Jenny | The Australian Sociological Association.

Publisher: unpub. 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Conference paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference. Social Causes, Private Lives (2010 : North Ryde, N.S.W.) INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: This paper examines the effects of the Global Financial Crisis (GFC) on several dimensions of the day-to-day lives of Australians: changes in total income; changes in usual hours worked; satisfaction with financial position and perceptions of job security. Using longitudinal data collected in Waves 6, 7 and 8 of the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey (n=11061), I find that although the GFC had not impacted upon unemployment nor usual hours worked, retired Australians were less satisfied with their financial position and employed people were becoming concerned about job security.Availability: (1)

Australian immigration and settlement in the 21st century : /

by Colic-Peisker, Val | The Australian Sociological Association.

Publisher: unpub. 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Conference paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference. Social Causes, Private Lives (2010 : North Ryde, N.S.W.) Includes bibliographical references. INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: This paper analyses quantitative data on settler arrivals in Australia over the past decade and data from the most recent Australian census in order to address two main questions: 1. who gets Australian permanent visas through two points-tested immigration programs, - Family and Skill, and 2. how do highly skilled settlers fare in the Australian labour market. Both questions focus on the variable of the country of birth/country of citizenship of the immigrants as the two characteristics largely overlap.Availability: (1)

Youth, homelessness, and embodiment : moralised aesthetics and affective suffering /

by Farrugia, David | The Australian Sociological Association.

Publisher: unpub. 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Conference paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference. Social Causes, Private Lives (2010 : North Ryde, N.S.W.) Bibliography : p. 9Summary: This paper explores the process of embodiment for young people experiencing homelessness. Drawing on interviews with 20 young people, descriptions of embodied feelings and practices are related to the moral and aesthetic regulatory norms which construct bodies in contemporary modern societies. Young people experiencing homelessness are excluded from the private sphere, meaning they are unable to practice the reflexive body practices required of modern subjects. These young people also lack access to consumer goods, meaning they are unable to construct the forms of aesthetic embodiment expected of young people in a consumer society. The outcome of these exclusions is a form of embodied suffering.Availability: (1)

Social Support Networks and subjective well-being in Queensland /

by Huang, Xianbi | The Australian Sociological Association.

Publisher: unpub. 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Conference paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference. Social Causes, Private Lives (2010 : North Ryde, N.S.W.) Bibliography : p. 13Summary: This paper examines discussion networks (social support networks with whom people can discuss problems), perceived social support and their associations with subjective social well-being in Queensland, Australia. Data from the Living in Queensland survey in 2008 are drawn on for empirical analysis. Main findings include: (1) Queensland people have larger discussion networks than reported in US research (comparable references are absent in previous Australian studies). (2) Respondents‟ sociodemographic characteristics are significantly associated with the size of discussion networks and the purpose of using discussion networks. (3) Role relations are linked to different kinds of social support in different domains. Kin play an extensive role in providing various social supports. (4) The use of discussion networks and the sources of perceived social support have significant associations with life satisfaction but the size of discussion networks does not. These results indicate that in Queensland kin remain the most essential providers of perceived social support and personal networks affect subjective well-being. Although the research is exploratory, it produces new empirical evidence to enrich Australia‟s social network studies. Practically it has policy implications in terms of issues of social cohesion and community engagement.Availability: (1)

Financial inclusion in Australia and the potential of social networks /

by Lu, Justin W | The Australian Sociological Association.

Publisher: unpub. 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Conference paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference. Social Causes, Private Lives (2010 : North Ryde, N.S.W.) Bibliography : p. 10-14Summary: The issue of financial exclusion is becoming increasingly prevalent in Australia. The inability to access appropriate and affordable financial products and services from mainstream financial institutions can substantially inhibit an individual's capacity to participate in modern society. While governments have repeatedly turned to the social sphere for solutions to community problems, contemporary interest in questions of inclusion have thus far failed to adequately recognise the utility of networks in promoting financial inclusion. Yet, the idea that social networks have value is not new. Nor are studies of the peer group dynamics and support that enable collective benefits. This paper will argue that harnessing the power of social networks can offer an innovative response to both social and financial exclusion. The way in which networks can be drawn upon to support excluded individuals and encourage participation will also be examinedAvailability: (1)

Dispositional change for a new work habitus : is that all it takes for retrenched textile workers? /

by Keating, Maree | The Australian Sociological Association.

Publisher: unpub. 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Conference paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference. Social Causes, Private Lives (2010 : North Ryde, N.S.W.) Bibliography : p. 13-14 INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: Changes in the Australian economy brought about by the 'Global Financial Crisis' saw tangible effects in early 2009 with another downturn in the manufacturing sector in Victoria and New South Wales. The well publicised retrenchment in March 2009 of 1,850 employees from Pacific Brands, became a story which provoked much public response. In the years leading up to 2009, however, retrenchment had affected thousands of workers in large, iconic companies such as Blundstones in Hobart and Yakka in Albury/Wodonga. This paper discusses the dispositional changes undergone by those retrenched workers who stayed in the labour market, and the circumstances under which 'desirable' personal adaptations resulted in advantages for them. The current emphasis placed by training and employment policy on the individual's acquisition of 'employability' attributes, qualities and orientation fails to recognise the ways in which constructions of work within particular occupations and industries generate conditions which advantage or disadvantage individuals and in which particular dispositions might thrive.Availability: (1)

'We're multicultural mate!' : regional Australian discourses of multiculturalism and the reproduction of 'white Australia' as a national identity /

by Koerner, Catherine | The Australian Sociological Association | Haggis, Jane.

Publisher: unpub. 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Conference paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference. Social Causes, Private Lives (2010 : North Ryde, N.S.W.) Bibliography : p. 10-11Summary: This paper considers the complexities of 'everyday understandings' of multiculturalism as a discourse to deal with racialised difference. The paper is based on one of the author's doctoral research which analyses the complexities of how whiteness and race are socially produced and lived in regional Australia. Drawing on a set of qualitative interviews conducted in South Australia with 29 people who self-identity as 'white Australian' we consider the social and political history of a 'white Australia' continues to inform the terms of multiculturalism for these people. We argue that this reflects the ways that state multiculturalism manages diversity and obscures the language of race. As a consequence the white national identity remains raced without an everyday vocabulary to deal with it.Availability: (1)

Partnership for impoving outcomes in Indigenous education : relationship or business? /

by Ma Rea, Zane | The Australian Sociological Association.

Publisher: unpub. 2010Description: PDF.Other title: Partnership and Indigenous education.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Conference paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference. Social Causes, Private Lives (2010 : North Ryde, N.S.W.)Summary: This paper examines the Australian government's Indigenous strategy, in particular interrogating the concept of 'partnership', and its sub-injunctions of 'mutual respect, mutual resolve, and mutual obligation' between education service providers and remote and very remote Indigenous communities through the lens of three case study examples.Availability: (1)

Aboriginality and the Northern Territory Intervention /

by Macoun, Alissa | The Australian Sociological Association.

Publisher: unpub. 2010Description: PDF.Other title: The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference..Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Conference paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference. Social Causes, Private Lives (2010 : North Ryde, N.S.W.) Bibliography : p. 11-14Summary: This paper examines constructions of Aboriginality circulating in discourse surrounding the 2007 introduction of the Northern Territory Emergency Response (the intervention). It provides a preliminary analysis of several constructions of Aboriginality that are deployed to justify the intervention, and identifies subject positions, values, logics and power relations that these constructions create, reflect, sustain and foreclose.Availability: (1)

"Where are you from" : the paradox of African identity and belonging in Australia /

by Mapedzahama, Virginia | The Australian Sociological Association.

Publisher: unpub. 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Conference paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference. Social Causes, Private Lives (2010 : North Ryde, N.S.W.)Summary: This paper interrogates the question 'where are you from' by drawing on our experiences and points of view as visibly different African migrants who get asked this 'quintessential question of identity' almost on a daily basis. While acknowledging that a certain 'curiosity' sometimes drives the asking of this question, we still question the implications and multiplicity of meanings to those whom it is asked. We contend that being asked the question raises three key issues for us. First, we perceive it as exclusionary, in that in a white dominated society it is asked, mainly of certain groups of people who are visibly different. Second, the assumption behind the question - that one is not 'from here', constructs an/other whose identity is fixed and tied only to one faraway place, thereby erasing our hyphenated identities, which define our everyday lived realities. Third, it invokes feelings of ambivalence about place when it is interpreted as demanding a justification of the claim to belonging and being 'from here'. Our paper shows that the question is a matter of identity politics and exposes the complexity of identity work that occurs whenever this question is asked of us. In so doing, it highlights the contradiction between our Australian 'selves' and migrant 'other'.Availability: (1)

Applied learning after class /

by Pardy, John | The Australian Sociological Association.

Publisher: unpub. 2010Description: PDF.Other title: The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference..Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Conference paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference. Social Causes, Private Lives (2010 : North Ryde, N.S.W.) Bibliography : p. 11-12 SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: By foregrounding teachers, practices in the Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning (VCAL) this paper illustrates how social class can be deployed to critically explain inequalities and differences in schooling. Applied learning is represented as a practical and 'un-academic' schooling option for the 'difficult to teach', and has similarities with earlier institutional forms of working class schooling as provided in Technical Schools. Schooling through VCAL prepares students differently than general schooling by instigating a new subjective and cultural shift in schooling. ; VICTORIAN CERTIFICATE OF APPLIED LEARNING (VCAL)Availability: (1)

Returns to ambition : the role of early career plans in the transition from education to work /

by Sikora, Joanna | The Australian Sociological Association.

Publisher: unpub. 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Conference paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference. Social Causes, Private Lives (2010 : North Ryde, N.S.W.) SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: Although the literature on educational plans and attainments of youth is comprehensive, less is known about the role which specific career choices, formed early in high school, may play in attaining high status professional occupations. This is mostly due to lack of longitudinal data, as rarely do high school students get asked about their plans and then, years later, about their actual jobs. However, the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth of students who were in Year 9 in 1998 do have the information on career plans of students and their later occupational attainment. Thus it is possible to compare early choices and the actual jobs held by LSAY respondents who were surveyed every year until 2008. This analysis focuses on the relative importance of individual plans versus family background and academic achievement in enabling Generation Y, as this cohort is known, to realise their early ambitions. I find that adolescent career plans are consequential even after plans to attend university and the actual university completion have been taken into account. This is important as clearly stopping at planning to go to university is not enough. Returns to early vocational ambitions are more evident for employment defined by respondents as 'career related'.Availability: (1)

The influence of the post-secondary school transition on the temporal structure of everyday life and alcohol consumption /

by Woodman, Dan | The Australian Sociological Association.

Publisher: unpub. 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Conference paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference. Social Causes, Private Lives (2010 : North Ryde, N.S.W.) SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: This paper explores how the transition from secondary school to tertiary study and employment impacts on the temporal structuring of daily life. I present findings from the analysis of 50 interviews conducted with young people in Australia (all aged 19-20). I suggest that that this group highly value time with their friends but that structural changes in the contemporary world, particularly at this point of transition, make finding this shared time more difficult. While the emergence of a '24 hour, 7 day a week' and 'flexible' economic and social structure in one sense facilitates going out with friends, as the participants left secondary school and moved into new courses of study and paid work, this same structure shaped the timetables of their lives in individualised and inconsistent ways that made organising shared free time with significant others more difficult. As a substitute for a greater quantity of shared time, when the participants managed to coordinate schedules with close friends they looked for more intense affective experiences, such as that facilitated by high-level alcohol consumptionAvailability: (1)

Cultural Chameleons : an investigation into the construction and influences of working-class identities on the formal learning of white, baby-boomer males /

by Lovett, Trevor | The Australian Sociological Association.

Publisher: unpub. 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Conference paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference. Social Causes, Private Lives (2010 : North Ryde, N.S.W.) Bibliography : p. 9-11Summary: This paper outlines the findings of a qualitative, narrative, retrospective investigation into white, working-class, baby-boomer males? perceptions of their own formal educational experiences. The study while accepting the significance of the socio-economic/class correlation also identified important non-material influences of class on the participants? formal learning. The investigation revealed how discursively marginalized social identities negotiated their relationship with formal learning environments. Social persistence or continuity was considered problematic because many effects normally associated with a stratified social structure were not obvious in the research data. The study showed that the participants' educational potential was affected more by the dynamics of personal interaction than broad socially constructed differences. It was found that the educational and social opportunities of the participant sample tended to be a consequence of the respect individual actors showed for each other both within and outside the context of the school.Availability: (1)

The politics of homelessness in the Australian print media /

by Zufferey, Carole | The Australian Sociological Association.

Publisher: unpub. 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Conference paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference. Social Causes, Private Lives (2010 : North Ryde, N.S.W.) Bibliography : p. 10-11Summary: The media plays an important role in politicising social problems such as homelessness. This paper argues that political debates and media representations of homelessness frame options available to policy makers and social work practitioners and shape policy and practice responses to homelessness. Positive and compassionate representations of homelessness can influence the development of respectful and inclusive policy and practice approaches to homelessness. However, dominant representations of homelessness in the print media that individualise social problems also reinforce deep-seated community values that maintain unequal power and gender relations and transcend political changes in society.Availability: (1)

Young people, work and welfare : an 'underclass' of 'badly behaving' youth? /

by Martin, Sonia | The Australian Sociological Association.

Publisher: unpub. (Brotherhood of St Laurence) 2008Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Refereed paper submitted to the annual conference of The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) : Re-imagining Sociology. 2-5 December 2008 at the University of Melbourne, Parkville. Victoria. INTO AND OUT OF WORK SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: Current welfare arrangements are underpinned by contentious assumptions about the behaviour and morality of welfare beneficiaries. The agenda is guided by the belief that the sources of disadvantage and exclusion are largely attributable to the perceived behavioural problems and moral shortcomings of the disadvantaged themselves, and the perceived disincentive effects of the welfare state, manifest in what is believed to be an 'underclass'. The policy solution is to tighten eligibility requirements, coerce individuals into behaving in prescribed ways and to enforce labour market participation. Guided by critical social inquiry, the paper asks whether the 'underclass' is a useful heuristic device for understanding some young people's disengagement from the labour market. Reporting on interview findings with 27 young people with varying attachments to work, the paper explores respondents' experiences of, and their values and attitudes towards, work and welfare and examines whether there is evidence to suggest some welfare recipients are 'behaving badly'.Availability: (1)

Exploring economism in migration policy and research /

by Boese, Martina | The Australian Sociological Association.

Publisher: unpub. 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Conference paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference. The Future of Sociology. (2009 : Canberra, A.C.T.) INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: Stating the need for immigration and pointing to its benefits for the receiving country is a known strategy in political discourse to encourage public support of increased immigration targets or liberalised immigration. The economic benefits of migration have traditionally served as a counterargument against political fears of xenophobia in many European countries, and in Australia, they have helped to replace an immigration policy based on exclusion. Needs and benefits are usually described in relation to the host economy, more specifically the labour market and income through tax. The language of needs and cost-benefits which has become normalised in immigration policy in Australia as well as internationally is however not restricted to the policy sphere. It extends into the area of research on immigration and settlement. ; This paper will first discuss the economic rationales underpinning Australian immigration policy with a particular focus on regional settlement policies before exploring manifestations of economism in analyses of migration and reflecting on implications for the sociological analysis of migration. The paper is based on a literature and policy review for a new Australian Research Council Linkage project on migrants and refugees' settlement in rural and regional Australia.Availability: (1)

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