Brotherhood of St Laurence

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Expectations & aspirations : public attitudes towards social care /

by Institute for Public Policy Research.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: In advance of the publication of a government Green Paper on social care, ippr and Pricewaterhouse Coopers LLP commissioned research to explore public levels of awareness and understanding of social care provision. The findings expose a lack of awareness about social care, confusion about how services are funded and a widespread lack of preparation or planning for future care needs.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Now it's personal : personal advisers and the new public service workforce /

by McNeil , Clare | Institute for Public Policy Research.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 88-91 INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: For many of us, our experience of public services is shaped largely by our interaction with the frontline staff with whom we come into contact. The quality of that interaction can be just as important to us as the outcome we receive from the service. That a service is only as good as the people delivering it has become a clich . Yet what that understanding implies for public policy and how services are designed has not been sufficiently explored. This report gives shape to the argument that the next focus of public sector reform should be on the relationship between the citizen and frontline staff in public services. It does so by focusing on what matters in the relationship between citizen and the state on the frontline of public services. Specifically, it considers how the relationship between adviser and benefit claimant can be improved by ensuring frontline staff have the right incentives, degree of control over their work and autonomy to provide effective and responsive services.Availability: (1)

Building communities of trust : community cohesion in the north /

by Hole, Sally | Institute for Public Policy Research.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: This report reflects on the ippr north conference, 'Building Communities of Trust: Community Cohesion in the North'. The event was held on 29 June 2009 in Sunderland, supported by Gentoo Group and Sunderland City Council. The conference was attended by 100 delegates from statutory, private, voluntary and community sectors. Delegates were predominantly from the North East but also included representatives from across the North of England and Scotland. ; The conference sought to explore the role of local authorities and third sector organisations in building trust and cohesion in all communities across the North, asking what particular challenges the region faces and how positive connections between communities can be fostered.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

When times are tough : four families' stories /

by Ben-Galim, Dalia | Institute for Public Policy Research | Seal-Jones, Rachel.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: IPPR has examined how 58 low-income families manage their day-to-day finances. The innovative research, which took place in London, Newcastle, Nottingham and Glasgow in 2008-2009, has provided insight into the pressures that many low-income families face as they struggle to balance their income and expenditure. ; We are publishing four case studies from the research to illustrate the impact of broad social and economic trends at household level and share knowledge and data. Each case study has been chosen to provide an individual family narrative around poverty and the economic crisis. ; They focus on: ; Living with a disability - how one family in Newcasle is coping after an accident left the main breadwinner disabled and unable to work. ; Lone parents and low pay - why employment has not been a route out of poverty for one lone-parent family in London. ; Redundancy - how redundancy has dramatically changed the financial circumstances of one household in Glasgow and its impact on daily family life. ; The poverty premium - perceptions of the current financial crisis through the eyes of one family in Nottingham and how this affects the premium low-income families pay on essential goods and servicesAvailability: (1)

Policies for Peace of Mind : devolution and older age in the UK /

by McCormick, James | Institute for Public Policy Research | McDowell, Eleanor | Harris, Andrew.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: This paper considers the changing landscape of policy and practice for older people since 2000 and how this varies across the four countries of the United Kingdom. We reflect on UK Government reforms over this period as well as the early choices made by the devolved administrations, which have varying powers.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Ageing and well-being in an international context /

by Clifton, Jonathan | Institute for Public Policy Research.

Publisher: Institute for Public Policy Research 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: This report opens up the policy debates surrounding population ageing beyond the traditional realm of healthcare and pensions. It explores how the well-being of older people can be incorporated into four other areas: relationships, work, learning and the built environment. These were all identified in the first phase of ippr?s Politics of Ageing project as important drivers of well-being. ; This paper provides examples of policies and programmes that have been successful in other countries. The aim is that these case studies will inspire new responses to ageing in the UK.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The future's green : jobs and in the UK low-carbon transition /

by Bird, Jenny | Institute for Public Policy Research | Kayte Lawton.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: Since 2008 there has been a significant increase in attention to the idea of jobs in lowcarbon and environmental services, known as ?green jobs? ? which can help tackle climate change and unemployment at the same time ? from politicians from across the political spectrum. In July 2009, the Government published its Low Carbon Industrial Strategy, which sets out how it will take advantage of the ?low-carbon opportunity?, to develop Low Carbon Economic Areas and to stimulate further low-carbon innovation. ; However, there is a failure to acknowledge that some jobs may also be at risk in the lowcarbon transition and there could be a backlash against policies designed to tackle climatechange as the potential impacts on vulnerable sectors become clear. The strategy also implies that ?green? jobs will help cut unemployment but the most optimistic estimates of new job creation fall a long way short of the numbers needed to make any significant decrease. These two problems suggest that the UK needs an economic development plan that will identify where new jobs will come from in the future, and how these jobs will be ?low-carbon compatible?.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Towards a Smarter State /

by Institute for Public Policy Research.

Publisher: London, U.K. IPPR, Institute for Public Policy Research 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: A major debate about the role of the state has opened up in British politics that looks set to define and frame the policy agendas of the major political parties in the run up to the next general election and beyond. Although this debate pre-dates the financial crisis and the deepening recession that has engulfed the economy, such developments will have a profound impact on public services and have already begun to catalyse a fundamental reappraisal of the state, to which all parties must respond.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Youth Tracker : reporting on challenges and solutions for young people in recession and recovery /

by Lawton, Kayte | Institute for Public Policy Research | Bua, Adrian.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: ippr and the Private Equity Foundation have come together to produce a quarterly newsletter - the Youth Tracker - aimed at everyone working with young people in the UK. The Tracker will provide an overview and commentary on new research, policy and data, with a particular focus on young people not in employment, education or training ('NEETs'). Our focus will be the effects of recession on vulnerable young people, as well as what can be done to better support them. The Tracker will cover diverse topics, including education, health, crime, employment and well-being and will deliver accessible information and resources for busy professionals, as well as providing a space for opinion and debate.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Saving and asset-building in low-income households /

by Dolphin, Tony | Institute for Public Policy Research.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: December 2009Summary: This is of study of the income, spending, saving and borrowing of 58 low-income families which reveals that most have a positive attitude to the idea of saving, but find it very difficult to translate that attitude into actual saving for any length of time.Availability: (1)

Strength Against Shocks - Low-income families and debt /

by Ben-Galim, Dalia | Institute for Public Policy Research | Lanning, Tess.

Publisher: IPPR, Institute for Public Policy Research 2009Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: Innovative research with 58 low-income families in London, Newcastle, Nottingham and Glasgow aimed to understand what the expansion of household debt has meant for the lives of low-income families. In-depth interviews, an income and expenditure diary and regular telephone conversations over four months explored patterns of income, spending and borrowing.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

A qualitative study of apprenticeship pay: an ippr report to the Low Pay Commission /

by Lawton, Kayte | Institute for Public Policy Research | Norris, Emma.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: January 2010 Bibliography : p. 61 SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: Although most apprentices are employed, the majority are exempt from UK National Minimum Wage legislation, and pay rates for apprentices vary significantly across different industries and by gender and age. The Low Pay Commission (LPC) has been asked by Government to consider how apprentice pay could be brought under the National Minimum Wage framework. This report, commissioned by the Low Pay Commission, examines variations in apprentice pay across the UK and the role of apprentice pay in young people?s decisions to start and complete an apprenticeship. The report also considers the potential responses of employers to the introduction of a national minimum wage for apprentices.Availability: (1)

Why interns need a fair wage /

by Lawton, Kayte | Institute for Public Policy Research | Potter, Dom.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: (1)

In-work poverty in the recession : briefing note /

by Gottfried, Glenn | Institute for Public Policy Research | Lawton, Kayte.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: (1)

Green and decent jobs : the case for local action /

by Bird, Jenny | Institute for Public Policy Research | Lawton, Kayte | Purnell, Kandida.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2010Description: 45 p.: ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: Green jobs are often heralded as the solution to the twin challenges of lowering our greenhouse gas emissions and bringing down unemployment. However, very little has been said about what new green jobs might look like ? who will be doing them, how much might they pay and where will they be? Unequal access to jobs, low pay and a lack of progression routes are endemic problems in some parts of the UK labour market. In this paper we argue that to maximise the benefits of the green jobs revolution, we must make sure that green jobs are also good jobs, paying a decent wage and offering more and better employment opportunities to a wide range of people. To make this a reality, we make the case for greater action at the local level, and by a greater range of individuals and organisations. We examine the potential for new partnerships between lots of different organisations ? based on examples of best practice from the USA ? to help ensure that new green jobs are right for local communities. This scoping paper is the first output from IPPR's 'Communities for Green and Decent Jobs' project, which began in autumn 2009.Availability: (1)

Equality, entitlements and localism /

by McCarvill, Phil | Institute for Public Policy Research.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2010Description: 10 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: June 2010Summary: This paper explores the relationship between localism and notions of equality of access and outcomes for a range of groups and communities. The specific focus throughout is on the needs and experiences of those disabled people, ethnic minorities, older and younger people who are economically and socially excluded and/or currently experience differential outcomes from key public services. The central argument at the heart of this paper is that genuine localism will only be achieved if Whitehall believes that it can trust key parts of the public sector and local communities to deliver effective, accessible and equitable services for all.Availability: (1)

Rebalancing local economies : Widening economic opportunities for people in deprived communities /

by Cox, Ed (ed.) | Institute for Public Policy Research.

Publisher: London Institute for Public Policy Research One North East on behalf of The Northern Way 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: October 2010 Bibliography : 92-96 p.Summary: The programme set out to understand why some deprived areas within city regions in the North of England have prospered whilst others have remained deprived even when the surrounding economy was performing strongly; to explore how deprived areas can be better linked to areas of economic opportunity; to consider the roles of local, sub-national and national bodies; and to inform a new generation of policies targeted at deprived neighbourhoods.Availability: (1)

Alternatives to child immigration detention : what are the options for the Coalition government? /

by Institute for Public Policy Research.

Publisher: Institute for Public Policy Research 2010Description: 8 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: In the United Kingdom, the Coalition Agreement, released in May 2010, stated that the Coalition government would 'end the detention of children for immigration purposes'. As a result, the UK Border Agency (UKBA) recently led a review on the practice. The formal review period ended two months ago, on 9 July 2010. No date has yet been set for publishing the findings of the review, but announcements are expected in the coming weeks. We believe the government deserves credit for confirming that they will end this inhumane and ineffective policy, and for establishing a review into alternatives to the practice. However, ending child detention clearly raises significant challenges for the government which are proving difficult to overcome. This briefing provides some background to the developments in this area, and sets out how two important principles can and should be put into practice by the government: ; First, ending the detention of children must mean ending the detention of families. We question the effectiveness of a 'no-detention policy' that is aimed only at children and not at families as a whole. Families should not be split up and any policy that requires this would be unworkable as well as inhumane. Asylum-seeking families should be allowed to live in the community and be supported by a trained family-worker right from the start of the asylum process. ; Second, the government is entitled to remove families with children from the UK once they have exhausted their rights of appeal in their asylum cases, and any change in policy must facilitate rather than frustrate return in these circumstances. Those arguing against detention must be able to show that alternatives are not only more humane but will also assist in the removal process. Greatly improving the environment of respect, particularly between asylum-seeking families and UKBA but also between migrant-supporting NGOs and UKBA, is crucial if alternatives to detention are going to be successfully put into practice.Availability: (1)

Review of access to essential services : financial inclusion and utilities /

by Lawton, Kayte | Institute for Public Policy Research | Platt, Reg.

Publisher: London Institute for Public Policy Research 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: October 2010 Bibliography : p. 55-57 An ippr report to the Equality and Human Rights Commission.Summary: This report was commissioned by the Equality and Human Rights Commission to inform its first Triennial Review of inequalities and human rights in the UK. The report focuses on two interlinked policy areas, loosely brought together under the concept of access to essential services: financial exclusion and affordable utilities. We deal with each policy area in separate sections of the report and our focus is on providing statistical and other evidence about the extent of exclusion and inequalities, and how this plays out across the different equality groups. Financial exclusion refers to the inability, difficulty or reluctance to access appropriate mainstream financial services. The effects can include an inability to take part in day-to-day financial transactions; the inability to cope with unexpected events or planned lifestyle changes; and having to pay more for certain products and services. Given the essentially universal provision of energy and water services in the UK, the central issue when it comes to equality in the utilities is cost and affordability. In recent years, the primary concern has been around fuel poverty and the serious negative effects this can have on the health and well-being of certain groups.Availability: (1)

When times are tough : tracking household spending and debt through diaries - interim findings /

by Ben-Galim, Dalia | Institute for Public Policy Research | Lanning, Tess.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: The financial crisis and recession have highlighted the unsustainable nature of the economic growth that went before. While there is much discussion around the recession, global capitalism and what principles will underpin economic recovery, ippr has been exploring the particular impacts on families as part of a ground-breaking project on consumer spending and debt. Through this innovative research - which looks at households - circumstances in great detail - we are gaining an understanding of people's daily expenditure. ; This briefing presents the interim findings from our research, undertaken over four months with low-income families across the UK, which aims to produce in-depth understanding of the dynamics between spending, saving and debt. It provides fresh insight into the impact of the recession on the daily realities of people's lives. ; The next stage of the project will analyse the findings in more detail to offer insight into how families - specifically those on low incomes - are coping in the recession. It will also look at the savings and assets agenda and how people are coping with debt, with policy recommendations presented based on this analysis. ; This briefing provides an opportunity to reflect on some of the emerging themes being generated from rich data collection and analysis. The findings here are illustrative.Availability: (1)

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