Brotherhood of St Laurence

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The new economy revisited : an initial analysis of the digital divide among financially disadvantaged families /

by McLaren, Jennifer | The Smith Family | Zappala, Gianni.

Publisher: Camperdown, N.S.W. Research and Social Policy Team, The Smith Family 2002Description: viii, 28 p. ill.Other title: The Smith Family. Research and Social Policy Team background.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: September 2002 Summary: This paper presents new data on the access and usage of Information and Communications Technology (ICT), in particular, computers and the Internet, by households and children from financially disadvantaged backgrounds. The existence of unequal access and usage of ICT across the population – the ‘digital divide’, is compounding disadvantage for some, because having access to ICT is becoming so central to being able to fully participate in the economic, social, political and cultural spheres of society. This is the first of several publications that provides empirical data to complement previous conceptual work on the ‘new economy’ and the digital divide. This paper focuses on what has been termed the ‘A’ of the ‘ABCs of the digital divide’ – Access, Basic Training and Content. The data come from a survey aimed at collecting benchmark data on computer and Internet access and usage among students and families on The Smith Family’s Learning for Life (LFL) program. Availability: (1)

Post-school plans : aspirations, expectations and implementation : a report prepared for the Smith Family.

by Beavis, Adrian | The Smith Family | Murphy, Martin | Bryce, Jennifer | Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER).

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. The Smith Family 2004Description: 88 p.Other title: Post-school plans : aspirations, expectations And implementation.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: March 2004 Summary: This study investigates the relations between post-school plans, family background and having a lifelong learning orientation.Availability: (1)

Connecting communities with CTLCs : from the digital divide to social inclusion. /

by Muir, Kristy | The Smith Family.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. The Smith Family 2004Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Youth unemployment in Australia : a contextual, governmental and organisational perspective

by Muir, Kristy | The Smith Family | Maguire, Anne | Slack-Smith, Daniel.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. The Smith Family 2003Description: 45 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: November 2003 Report by the Smith Family for the AMP FoundationAvailability: (1)

Home-to-school transitions for financially disadvantaged children : final report /

by Smart, Diana et.al | The Smith Family.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. The Smith Family 2008Description: PDF.Notes: Bibliography: p. 50-55Summary: "This report seeks to identify the factors that facilitate or impede the school transitions of Australian children from financially disadvantaged families." -- Publisher websiteAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Connecting for careers : the iTrack On-line Youth Mentoring Program. /

by The Smith Family.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. The Smith Family 2007Description: PDF.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The Smith Family. /

by The Smith Family.

Publisher: 12/17/2002 15:54:50http://www.smithfamily.com.au/ 2002Notes: Description based on contents viewed : 17 December 2002 Mode of access : WORLD WIDE WEB ONLINE RESOURCEAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

2010 micro business summit /

by The Smith Family.

Publisher: [Melbourne] unpub. [2010]Description: 68 p.: ill.Other title: Micro business summit.Notes: Organisation Committee includes: Elaine Henry, The Smith Family; Toby Hall, Mission Australia; Tony Nicholson, Brotherhood of St Laurence, Steven Persson, The Big Issue; Robert Doyle, Lord Mayor City of Melbourne; David Brookes, Social Traders; David Eldridge, The Salvation Army; Andrew Penn, AXA Asia PacificSummary: This paper summarises the discussions that took place at the summit and the feedback received following it along with recommendations for how micro business can help disadvantaged Australians take a step of of disadvantage.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Unequal opportunities : life chances for children in the 'lucky' country /

by Cassells, Rebecca | The Smith Family | McNamara, Justine | Gong, Honge (Cathy) | Bicknell, Sharon.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Smith Family 2011Description: 23 p. PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: "We wish to thank and acknowledge the contributions of: The AMP Foundation and the National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling (NATSEM)"Summary: The Smith Family and NATSEM have developed a suite of indicators that capture aspects of equality of opportunity and social mobility of Australian children and young people, which can be used to assess whether any change is taking place and if so, in what direction. A key goal of this research report is to assess the degree to which our society is able to provide children and young people with the opportunities to develop the skills they need to participate effectively, especially those most financially disadvantaged. This is important, not only from an equity perspective, but also an economic perspective. As a nation we need individuals to be able to leverage new educational opportunities, adapt career trajectories, contribute economically and reach their potential regardless of their social status, background or income in order to achieve productivity and participation goals.Availability: (1)
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Preparing students for the transition to work or further study : engaging students: building Aspirations /

by Williams, Irene | The Smith Family.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Smith Family 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 50-57 SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: This literature review provides a comprehensive analysis of national and international research to assist with the development of an evidence-based model to better support students in Years 8-10 (13-16 years) as they progress through school and into work or further study.Availability: (1)

How is learning enhanced through improved health and nutrition? Are there key health issues impacting differently on the learning of children from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) and Indigenous backgrounds? /

by Williams, Irene | The Smith Family.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. The Smith Family 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography pp. 48-54Summary: This literature review addresses the question 'How is learning enhanced through improved health and nutrition?' Are there key health issues impacting differently on the learning of children from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) and Indigenous backgrounds?Availability: (1)

Improving educational outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander girls : The Smith Family Research Report June 2014 /

by The Smith Family.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Smith Family 2014Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Includes bibliographic references p. 26Summary: Teenage Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander girls are at risk of poorer school attendance, dropping out of school and not completing Year 12. In Alice Springs, indigenous girls face a range of challenges and obstacles that can negatively impact on their school attendance, educational achievements and life goals. These can include high levels of family unemployment, poor housing, exposure to violence, teenage pregnancy, racism and low expectations. Faced with these difficulties, many teenage Indigenous girls fail to finish Year 12, making it tough to find work and build a better future for themselves.Availability: (1)

Free education : who can afford it? /

by The Smith Family.

Publisher: unpub. 1997Description: 16 leaves.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The Smith Family's learning for life program a decade on : poverty and educational disadvantage. /

by Zappala, Gianni | The Smith Family | Parker, Ben.

Publisher: Camperdown, N.S.W. Research and Advocacy Team, The Smith Family 2000Description: v, 27 p.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Social exclusion and disadvantage in the new economy. /

by Zappala, Gianni | The Smith Family | Green, Vanessa | Parker, Ben.

Publisher: Camberdown, N.S.W. The Smith Family 2000Description: iv, 20 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: December 2000 Includes bibliographical references (p.18-20) Website : http://www.smithfamily.org.auAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Addressing disadvantage through place management : is there a role for nonprofit organisations? /

by Zappala, Gianni | The Smith Family | Green, Vanessa.

Publisher: Camperdown, N.S.W. The Smith Family 2001Description: vi, 18 p. : ill.Notes: January 2001 Includes bibliographical references (p. 18) Website : http://www.smithfamily.org.auAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Educational performance among school students from financially disadvantaged backgrounds. /

by Zappala, Gianni | The Smith Family | Considine, Gillian.

Publisher: Camperdown, N.S.W. The Smith Family 2001Description: v, 19 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: January 2001 Website : http://www.smithfamily.org.auSummary: The relationship between family socioeconomic status (SES) and the academic performance of children is well established in sociological research. A neglected dimension, however, are the factors that may influence educational outcomes within particular SES bands. This paper presents data on the educational performance of children from financially disadvantaged backgrounds and examines its variation as affected by traditional measures of SES as well as a range of other family, individual and contextual factors. This paper presents new data on a sample of over 3,000 students from financially disadvantaged backgrounds (students on The Smith Family’s Learning for Life program in 1999) to estimate the extent of socioeconomic, family, individual and contextual factors on school educational performance. Results obtained using binomial logistic regression techniques indicate that sex, unexplained absences, parental educational attainment, housing type, and student age are all statistically significant variables and predictors of academic performance. In contrast, ethnicity, family structure, the main source of family income, and geographical location do not significantly predict outcomes in school performance once other factors are controlled for. The finding that even within a group with considerable financial disadvantage, socioeconomic status as reflected by the level of parental education, was a key predictor of student academic achievement raises several policy implications. In brief, it supports the notion that the ‘social’ and the ‘economic’ components of the socioeconomic status equation may have distinct and separate influences on educational outcomes. While financial assistance to schools and families in need is important, policies and programs that also assist low-income parent/s in providing appropriate psychological and educational support for their children should also be promoted. Furthermore, in contrast to much publicised recent research and media comments on the negative effects of one-parent families on children, the findings do not support such a conclusion. Neither do the findings support the argument that one parent households may have relatively more detrimental effects on boys than girls. Consistent with other studies, however, the findings do confirm the existence of a significant gender gap in educational achievement among students from low socioeconomic status. The lack of significance of both ethnicity and geographical location once other factors are controlled for suggests that the current policy focus on boys’ behavioural problems is perhaps warranted. Finally, while geographical location was not a significant predictor of academic achievement, whether children live in private or public housing was found to be significant even after controlling for other factors. The significance of housing suggests that approaches to addressing disadvantage that are neighbourhood based should be encouraged. Availability: (1)

Corporate social responsibility in Australia : a select review of the literature. /

by Cronin, Caitlin | The Smith Family.

Publisher: Camperdown, N.S.W. Research and Advocacy Team, The Smith Family 2001Description: 23p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Website : http://www.smithfamily.com.auAvailability: (1)

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