Brotherhood of St Laurence

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The economic benefit of increased participation in education and training . /

by Access Economics.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Dusseldorp Skills Forum 2005Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.dsf.org.au/papers/173/DSFdoc_Apr05FINALrev_0.pdf' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:28:24 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Workforce participation in Victoria. /

by Access Economics.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Access Economics 2005Description: 93 p. : ill. (chiefly col.).Notes: 27 June 2005Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Dementia prevalence and incidence among Australians who do not speak English at home . /

by Access Economics.

Publisher: [Canberra, A.C.T.] Access Economics 2006Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Migrants fiscal impact model : 2008 update. /

by Access Economics.

Publisher: Access Economics 2008Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://immi.gov.au/media/publications/research/_pdf/migrants-fiscal-impact-april-2008.pdf' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:52:08 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success response Into & out of work INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: "This model provides a detailed profile of the effect of new migrants to Australia on the Commonwealth government budget, both in terms of revenues and outlays. A key element of the update was to incorporate results from the second wave of LSIA 3 (the third Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants in Australia). This data represents the latest information on migrants contributions and take-ups in their second year after arrival in Australia. LSIA data is used in the model for estimates of income by visa class, labour force characteristics and the take-up of a range of government benefits/payments. A range of other changes to visa categories, government programs, tax rates and thresholds and other data have been included in this update." -- Executive SummaryAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

An overview of the economic impact of Indigenous disadvantage /

by Access Economics.

Publisher: Barton, A.C.T. Access Economics 2008Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: This report assesses the economic benefits of alleviating Indigenous disadvantage including firstly the impact on Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and living standards in Australia and secondly the impact on the structure of government budgets. The aim is to provide a what if style scenario analysis to depict a hypothetical Australia where Indigenous Australians face the same opportunities and experiences as all Australians. The focus is on what could be . The complex policy and program mechanics of how to achieve a real reduction in the disadvantages faced by Indigenous Australians are not addressed." -- Executive summary.Availability: (1)

The impact of the global financial crisis on social services in Australia /

by Access Economics.

Publisher: [Canberra, A.C.T.] Access Economics 2008Description: 30 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: An issues paper prepared by Access Economics for Anglicare Australia, Catholic Social Services Australia, The Salvation Army and UnitingCare Australia. Family & early years School to work Into & out of work Retirement & ageingSummary: The current global financial crisis and its likely impact on the Australian economy will have an acute impact on the most disadvantaged members of society, as well as pushing increased numbers of low and middle income earners to seek the services of welfare agencies. Even during the recent period of buoyant economic conditions, agencies were reporting growing demand, and the emergence of a new clientele of mid-stream wage earners facing severe financial stress. This has been mirrored by academic research into new indicators of disadvantage. Instability in the financial sector and its flow-on effects to the rest of the economy, can only exacerbate these problems, putting an even greater strain on what are already overstretched social services." -- Executive summaryAvailability: (1)

Keeping dementia front of mind : incidence and prevalence 2009-2050. /

by Access Economics.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Access Economics 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: Access Economics was commissioned by Alzheimer's Australia to provide up-to-date estimates and projections of prevalence and incidence for people with dementia in Australia, states and territories segregated into Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) populations and non-CALD populations, as well as metropolitan and regional (rural and remote) areas.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Caring places : planning for aged care and dementia 2010-2050 : volume 1 /

by Cutler, Henry | Access Economics | Chao, Daphni | McKibbin, Rebecca.

Publisher: Barton, A.C.T. Access Economics 2010Description: 117 p.: ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography pp. 114-117Summary: One consequence of an ageing Australian population is the need for an aged care system that can respond to the needs of the older person, their families and carers. However, the current aged care system needs fundamental reform if the supply of community and residential care are to keep pace with the projected demand for care, while at the same time providing increased choice. Alzheimer?s Australia commissioned Access Economics to model different scenarios for the supply of aged care, to identify strategies to increase consumer choice and to promote service flexibility, and to identify funding options for a sustainable aged care system into the future. ; Some key points that have come out of the report: ; More than a quarter of a million older Australians will be without a care place by 2050 due to severe undersupply ; Significant and extensive reform of the aged care system is needed to address the needs of the ageing population ; Growth in the prevalence of dementia is a major driver in demand for care placeAvailability: (1)

The future of aged care in Australia /

by Access Economics.

Publisher: National Seniors Australia 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: A public policy discussion paper prepared for National Seniors Australia by Access EconomicsSummary: This report is intended to promote informed discussion about aged care policy in Australia. The views and opinions expressed in this paper are those of Access Economics and do not necessarily represent those of National Seniors Australia. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this document and any attachments, the uncertain nature of economic data, forecasting and analysis means that Access Economics Pty Limited is unable to make any warranties in relation to the information contained herein. Access Economics Pty Limited, its employees and agents disclaim liability for any loss or damage which may arise as a consequence of any person relying on the information contained in this document and any attachments.Availability: (1)

Caring places : planning for aged care and dementia 2010-2050 : volume 2 /

by Cutler, Henry | Access Economics | Chao, Daphni | McKibbin, Rebecca.

Publisher: Barton, A.C.T. Access Economics 2011Description: 132 p.: ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography pp. 131-132 Report by Access Economics Pty Limited for Alzheimer's AustraliaSummary: The purpose of Volume 2 of Caring Places: Planning for aged care and dementia 2010-2050 is to project the future requirements for aged care places and packages at the jurisdictional level,Aged Care Planning Regions (ACPRs), and Commonwealth Electoral Divisions (CEDs). This report complements the analysis presented in Volume 1 that was released by Alzheimer?s ; Australia in July, 2010 and is available at www.alzheimers.org.au. Volume 1 presented different scenarios for the future requirements for aged care places and packages between 2010 and 2050 at the national level, identified strategies to increase consumer choice and service flexibility, and presented funding options for a sustainable aged care system into the ; future. ; Volume 2 provides detailed projections of aged care supply according to current aged care ; planning policy (which is based on the proportion of the population aged 70 and over), and compares these with projections based on the supply of aged care services under two growth scenarios. ; The first growth scenario estimates the supply of aged care if planning were driven by increases in the population aged 85 and over (the highest users of aged care). This coincides with demographic planning recommended by the National Health and Hospital Reform Commission (NHHRC, 2009). The growth second scenario estimates the supply of aged care if planning were based on the projected growth in the prevalence of dementia in Australia over the next 40 years.Availability: (1)

Economic impact of closing the Indigenous gap in remote and very remote Australia /

by Access Economics.

Publisher: Alice Springs, N.T. The Cooperative Research Centre for Remote Economic Participation 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: August 2009 Includes bibliographical references "Report by Access Economics Pty Limited for Economic Futures Australia."Summary: Access Economics have been asked by the CRC to explore the likely economic benefits of two of the research areas proposed for the new CRC involving Indigenous populations of remote areas. Collectively, the objectives of these two areas is to 'close the gap' in Indigenous disadvantage, specifically to increase Indigenous outcomes in areas such as health, labour force participation, educational attainment and literacy to a closer or the same level as non Indigenous Australians. ; The following report is designed to supplement the CRC re-bid. It explains and justifies the link between 'closing the gap' and broader economic impacts. The approach estimates of the overall economic impacts of closing the gap. It does not address the question of whether the gap would be closed by the CRC research, or nor does the approach accommodate the costs of doing so. In this sense, it presents a potential upside if the research is successful, rather than a forecast per se.Availability: (1)

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