Brotherhood of St Laurence

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Barriers to participation : financial, educational and technological : a report into the barriers to societal participation among low-income Australians. /

by Zappala, Gianni [ed] | The Smith Family.

Publisher: Camperdown, N.S.W. Research & Social Policy Team, The Smith Family 2003Description: 82 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: March 2003 Includes bibliographical references. Website : http://www.smithfamily.com.auAvailability: (1)

The new economy revisited : an initial analysis of the digital divide among financially disadvantaged families /

by McLaren, Jennifer | The Smith Family | Zappala, Gianni.

Publisher: Camperdown, N.S.W. Research and Social Policy Team, The Smith Family 2002Description: viii, 28 p. ill.Other title: The Smith Family. Research and Social Policy Team background.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: September 2002 Summary: This paper presents new data on the access and usage of Information and Communications Technology (ICT), in particular, computers and the Internet, by households and children from financially disadvantaged backgrounds. The existence of unequal access and usage of ICT across the population – the ‘digital divide’, is compounding disadvantage for some, because having access to ICT is becoming so central to being able to fully participate in the economic, social, political and cultural spheres of society. This is the first of several publications that provides empirical data to complement previous conceptual work on the ‘new economy’ and the digital divide. This paper focuses on what has been termed the ‘A’ of the ‘ABCs of the digital divide’ – Access, Basic Training and Content. The data come from a survey aimed at collecting benchmark data on computer and Internet access and usage among students and families on The Smith Family’s Learning for Life (LFL) program. Availability: (1)

Post-school plans : aspirations, expectations and implementation : a report prepared for the Smith Family.

by Beavis, Adrian | The Smith Family | Murphy, Martin | Bryce, Jennifer | Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER).

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. The Smith Family 2004Description: 88 p.Other title: Post-school plans : aspirations, expectations And implementation.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: March 2004 Summary: This study investigates the relations between post-school plans, family background and having a lifelong learning orientation.Availability: (1)

Connecting communities with CTLCs : from the digital divide to social inclusion. /

by Muir, Kristy | The Smith Family.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. The Smith Family 2004Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Youth unemployment in Australia : a contextual, governmental and organisational perspective

by Muir, Kristy | The Smith Family | Maguire, Anne | Slack-Smith, Daniel.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. The Smith Family 2003Description: 45 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: November 2003 Report by the Smith Family for the AMP FoundationAvailability: (1)

Home-to-school transitions for financially disadvantaged children : final report /

by Smart, Diana et.al | The Smith Family.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. The Smith Family 2008Description: PDF.Notes: Bibliography: p. 50-55Summary: "This report seeks to identify the factors that facilitate or impede the school transitions of Australian children from financially disadvantaged families." -- Publisher websiteAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Connecting for careers : the iTrack On-line Youth Mentoring Program. /

by The Smith Family.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. The Smith Family 2007Description: PDF.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

How is learning enhanced through improved health and nutrition? Are there key health issues impacting differently on the learning of children from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) and Indigenous backgrounds? /

by Williams, Irene | The Smith Family.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. The Smith Family 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography pp. 48-54Summary: This literature review addresses the question 'How is learning enhanced through improved health and nutrition?' Are there key health issues impacting differently on the learning of children from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) and Indigenous backgrounds?Availability: (1)

The Smith Family's learning for life program a decade on : poverty and educational disadvantage. /

by Zappala, Gianni | The Smith Family | Parker, Ben.

Publisher: Camperdown, N.S.W. Research and Advocacy Team, The Smith Family 2000Description: v, 27 p.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Social exclusion and disadvantage in the new economy. /

by Zappala, Gianni | The Smith Family | Green, Vanessa | Parker, Ben.

Publisher: Camberdown, N.S.W. The Smith Family 2000Description: iv, 20 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: December 2000 Includes bibliographical references (p.18-20) Website : http://www.smithfamily.org.auAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Addressing disadvantage through place management : is there a role for nonprofit organisations? /

by Zappala, Gianni | The Smith Family | Green, Vanessa.

Publisher: Camperdown, N.S.W. The Smith Family 2001Description: vi, 18 p. : ill.Notes: January 2001 Includes bibliographical references (p. 18) Website : http://www.smithfamily.org.auAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Educational performance among school students from financially disadvantaged backgrounds. /

by Zappala, Gianni | The Smith Family | Considine, Gillian.

Publisher: Camperdown, N.S.W. The Smith Family 2001Description: v, 19 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: January 2001 Website : http://www.smithfamily.org.auSummary: The relationship between family socioeconomic status (SES) and the academic performance of children is well established in sociological research. A neglected dimension, however, are the factors that may influence educational outcomes within particular SES bands. This paper presents data on the educational performance of children from financially disadvantaged backgrounds and examines its variation as affected by traditional measures of SES as well as a range of other family, individual and contextual factors. This paper presents new data on a sample of over 3,000 students from financially disadvantaged backgrounds (students on The Smith Family’s Learning for Life program in 1999) to estimate the extent of socioeconomic, family, individual and contextual factors on school educational performance. Results obtained using binomial logistic regression techniques indicate that sex, unexplained absences, parental educational attainment, housing type, and student age are all statistically significant variables and predictors of academic performance. In contrast, ethnicity, family structure, the main source of family income, and geographical location do not significantly predict outcomes in school performance once other factors are controlled for. The finding that even within a group with considerable financial disadvantage, socioeconomic status as reflected by the level of parental education, was a key predictor of student academic achievement raises several policy implications. In brief, it supports the notion that the ‘social’ and the ‘economic’ components of the socioeconomic status equation may have distinct and separate influences on educational outcomes. While financial assistance to schools and families in need is important, policies and programs that also assist low-income parent/s in providing appropriate psychological and educational support for their children should also be promoted. Furthermore, in contrast to much publicised recent research and media comments on the negative effects of one-parent families on children, the findings do not support such a conclusion. Neither do the findings support the argument that one parent households may have relatively more detrimental effects on boys than girls. Consistent with other studies, however, the findings do confirm the existence of a significant gender gap in educational achievement among students from low socioeconomic status. The lack of significance of both ethnicity and geographical location once other factors are controlled for suggests that the current policy focus on boys’ behavioural problems is perhaps warranted. Finally, while geographical location was not a significant predictor of academic achievement, whether children live in private or public housing was found to be significant even after controlling for other factors. The significance of housing suggests that approaches to addressing disadvantage that are neighbourhood based should be encouraged. Availability: (1)

Corporate social responsibility in Australia : a select review of the literature. /

by Cronin, Caitlin | The Smith Family.

Publisher: Camperdown, N.S.W. Research and Advocacy Team, The Smith Family 2001Description: 23p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Website : http://www.smithfamily.com.auAvailability: (1)

Hearing children's voices in the Katherine region / The Smith Family

by The Smith Family.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W : The Smith Family, 2019Description: 34 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The Hearing Children’s Voices Project explores a different way of working with children in the Katherine Region. It aims to build the ability of children to have their say in a safe and respectful environment and hold a genuine voice within their community. The Katherine Region Communities for Children Facilitating Partner (CfC FP) facilitated this project to ensure our work is connected to and guided by what children think is important. We view this project as a foundation for ongoing relationships with schools and communities, to ensure we are able to best support children and families in the Katherine Region. The Hearing Children’s Voices Project took place over 11 months, from March 2018, with the initial direction developed in collaboration with child-related services across the Katherine Region. The Katherine Region CfC FP then partnered with four schools - Clyde Fenton School, Kintore Street School, Jilkminggan School and Timber Creek School - to address three key questions: what is important to children? how can we help children get the most out of school? and how can children best be heard? At each school, children were supported to design questions and conduct interviews with other kids and community members. While unique projects developed at each site, common to all sites was an increased voice of youngpeople; sharing and recording of ideas about what is important to children and how their communities can support them; and a commitment to working together to create the best communities for our children. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Preschool Attendance Strategies Project/ The Smith Family

by The Smith Family.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W : The Smith Family, 2019Description: ill. PDF.Online Access: Interim Report | Appendix 1 National Research Report Summary: Evidence from the Australian Early Development Census (AEDC) shows that in their first year of school, children from low socioeconomic areas and children from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander backgrounds, are more likely than their peers to be developmentally vulnerable. Participation in a quality early learning program in the year before school can promote children’s healthy development, and has the potential to reduce inequities in developmental outcomes for at-risk subpopulations. In 2008, The Council of Australian Governments (COAG) made the attendance of all children at a quality preschool program, for 15 hours a week or 600 hours annually in the year before full-time school, a national priority. Available data appears to indicate that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, children from vulnerable and disadvantaged backgrounds and children living in outer regional, remote and very remote areas are over-represented in the cohort of children who are not fully participating in preschool at the level identified by COAG. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

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