Brotherhood of St Laurence

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The time pressure illusion : discretionary time versus free time. /

by Goodin, Robert | Rice, James Mahmud | Bittman, Michael | Saunders, Peter.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2002Description: 45 p.Notes: September 2002 Includes bibliographical references website : http://www.sprc.unsw.edu.auAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The direct and indirect effects of unemployment on poverty and inequality. /

by Saunders, Peter | University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2002Description: 31 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: December 2002Availability: (1)

Reviewing the role and structure of pensions in their national context . /

by Saunders, Peter.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2003Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: October 2003Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Appliances and their impact : the ownership of domestic technology and time spent on household work. /

by Bittman, Michael | Rice, James Mahmud | Wajcman, Judy.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2003Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The price, cost, consumption and value of children. /

by Bradbury, Bruce | University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2004Description: [26 p.] PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: June 2004Summary: Though they are related, the price, cost, consumption and value of children are not the same. This paper explores two aspects of the relationship between these concepts. Even if we restrict attention to the domain of commodity consumption, the cost of children is not the same as children’s consumption. In this context, the cost of children to their parents is often described with a consumer equivalence scale. It is shown here that, under reasonable assumptions, children’s consumption of market goods is less than the ‘equivalent income’ of the household, but more than the ‘cost of children’. Expenditure costs, however, are only part of the cost of children. This paper uses a variant of the 'adult goods' method to estimate the full costs of children, including both expenditure and time costs. Adult personal time (comprising pure leisure, sleep and other personal care) is used as the adult good. Preliminary estimates using Australian data suggest a very large cost of children. The paper discusses the limitations of the estimation approach and considers the broader welfare implications of these costs. Availability: (1)

Examining recent changes in income distribution in Australia /

by Saunders, Peter | University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2003Description: 21 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: October 2003Availability: (1)

Assessing the quality and inter-temporal comparability of ABS Household Income Distribution Survey Data /

by Siminski, Peter | University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre | Saunders, Peter | Waseem, Saba | Bradbury, Bruce.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2003Description: 64p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: April 2003Availability: (1)

Competing visions : National Social Policy Conference 2001, 4-6 July 2001, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. /

by University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2001Description: HTML.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Caring differently : a time-use analysis of the type and social context of child care performed by fathers and by mothers. /

by Craig, Lyn.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2002Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: September 2002 Includes bibliographical references and index. Family & early yearsAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Time use and overlapping activities : evidence from Australia. /

by Floro, Maria Sagrario | Miles, Marjorie.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2001Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Includes bibliographical references and index. Family & early yearsAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The transition from unemployment to work : are casual jobs a short cut to permanent employment?

by Chalmers, Jenny | University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre | Kalb, Guyonne.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2000Description: 43 p. PDF.Other title: SPRC Discussion Paper no. 109.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: October 2000 Summary: This study examines the effect of casual work in shortening the time taken to move from unemployment into permanent work using longitudinal data from the Survey of Employment and Unemployment Patterns. The analysis is based on comparison of the transition rate from unemployment to permanent work with the combined transition rates of unemployment to casual work and casual work to permanent work. We use hazard rate models to estimate each of the transition rates. The models include observed and unobserved heterogeneity and allow for correlation between the transition rates. The evidence presented suggests that disadvantaged unemployed people can benefit from accepting casual work in their search for permanent work, although they are still less likely than others to obtain permanent work.Availability: (1)

Child poverty dynamics in seven nations. /

by Bradbury, Bruce | University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre | Jenkins, Steven | Micklewright, John.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2000Description: 51 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: December 2000 Includes bibliographical references and index.Availability: (1)

Women's financial independence : Australia in the 1980s and 1990s. /

by Burke, Sharon | University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre | Redmond, Gerry.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2002Description: 32 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: December 2002 Summary: Between the early 1980s and the mid 1990s (the 'Labor Years'), financial independence among Australian women increased. In this paper we investigate the changing characteristics of working age women, focussing on their financial independence. We combine an examination of policy and institutional changes that occurred in Australia during the 1980s and 1990s with an analysis of income survey microdata for the years 1982 and 1996-97. We argue that demographic changes (relating to marriage and fertility) and public policies in the fields of childcare and social security helped many women achieve financial independence during the 1980s and 1990s but the effects of restructuring and deregulation in the labour market dominated. Not all women gained equally. Young women in particular lost out, while older women made substantial advances. Single mothers profited mainly because of improvements in social security payments, while partnered mothers were increasingly able to engage in paid (though part-time) employment. We look at how policies and institutional change combined to produce these results, and also assess the possible impact on women's financial independence of policy changes that have occurred since Labor lost power in 1996.Availability: (1)

Volunteering : the human face of democracy. /

by Wilkinson, Jennifer | Bittman, Michael.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2002Description: 20 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: January 2002 Includes bibliographical references and index.Availability: (1)

Can social exclusion provide a new framework for measuring poverty?

by Saunders, Peter | University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2003Description: 19 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: October 2003Summary: This paper examines how the concept of social exclusion has evolved in the academic and policy debate in Australia in the last five years or so. It does not attempt to do this comprehensively, but illustrates some of the most important developments, in the process reflecting on some of the issues raised in earlier Australian contribution to the social exclusion literature. The paper is organised around three principal themes: concepts; measurement; and policy. One of the most attractive features of social exclusion is that it broadens the conventional framework that identifies poverty as a lack of resources relative to needs. In this respect, exclusion can be seen as extending other attempts to broader the resource notion of income poverty, specifically those associated with Townsend’s notion of relative deprivation Sen’s more recent ideas of functioning and capability. A range of issues raised in recent debate over the measurement of poverty and in related developments are then reviewed to illustrate the potential advantages of adopting a framework focused around the idea of social exclusion and how different dimensions of exclusion can be identified and quantified. Finally, evidence and experience from the UK and EC are used to show how an exclusion approach can help to promote, not replace, the need for additional work on poverty as conventionally defined and analysed. The paper concludes by arguing that researchers need to think more strategically about how research on exclusion and poverty can exert influence on those setting the policy agenda.Availability: (1)

Towards a credible poverty framework : from income poverty to deprivation. /

by Saunders, Peter | University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2004Description: 24p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: January 2004Summary: There have always been differences of view on what poverty means in conceptual terms, and even greater differences on how to measure it. These differences span a broad spectrum of normative and ideological positions and raise a number of technical issues surrounding the statistical measurement of poverty. This paper explains the role of poverty research and the value of a poverty line, while acknowledging that limitations exist with the current instruments. It argues that any poverty measure must include two key ingredients of poverty – the idea that resources are inadequate to meet basic needs and the notion that needs can only be defined relative to prevailing community attitudes and standards. Survey results are used to support the view that most Australians see poverty in subsistence terms, but this does not contradict the idea of relativity, since subsistence is itself a relative concept. The principal arguments are illustrated using data from the 1998-99 Household Expenditure Survey to estimate poverty on the basis of incomes, expenditures and a combination of a conventional income measure with additional data on hardship. The poverty rate is shown to be sensitive to which measure is chosen, both in aggregate and for specific groups in the population. However, all measures show that the group with the highest incidence of poverty is sole parent families, and that there is a strong association between joblessness and poverty, with full-time employment being required to escape poverty. The poverty rate among the aged is high when the conventional (income-based) measure is used, but far lower aged poverty rates are produced by many of the alternative poverty measures. State differences in income poverty are substantial but become much smaller when a deprivation-adjusted poverty measure is used. Availability: (1)

Social capital norms, networks and practices : a critical evaluation. /

by Patulny, Roger.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2004Description: 32 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: June 2004 Includes bibliographical referencesAvailability: (1)

Time to care : a comparison of how couple and sole parent households allocate time to work and children. /

by Craig, Lyn.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2004Description: 29 p.Notes: June 2004 Includes bibliographical references Family & early yearsAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Updating and extending indicative budget standards for older Australians : final report. /

by Saunders, Peter | Patulny, Roger | Lee, Adeline.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2004Description: 52 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: January 2004 Includes bibliographical referencesAvailability: (1)

Social inclusion : Australian Social Policy Conference 2003, 9-11 July 2003, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia /

by University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2003Description: HTML.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Program & AbstractsAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

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