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The benefits of vocational education and training /

by European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training.

Publisher: Luxembourg Publications Office of the European Union 2011Description: PDF.Other title: European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training..Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: This European research review of the benefits of vocational education and training (VET) is released at a time when Europe is taking stock of the progress achieved in the Lisbon process and has launched a new strategy for growth and swift recovery from the economic crisis. Investment in human resources by education, training and other forms of learning is essential to achieving smart, sustainable and inclusive growth. VET will continue to play an important role in the shift towards more knowledge-intensive societies. Around half of all jobs in 2020 will require a medium-level qualification, which will often be achieved by some form of VET.Availability: (1)

Vocational education and training for the common good : the macrosocial benefits of VET /

by European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training.

Publisher: Luxembourg Publications Office of the European Union 2011Description: PDF.Other title: European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training..Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 62-66Summary: This report considers two mechanisms by which initial vocational education and training (IVET) or continuing vocational education and training (CVET) might produce macrosocial benefits. First, the aggregate level of VET qualifications (measured by the incidence of VET qualifications among the population) might cause benefits through increasing the overall level of human capital. Second is its positive influence on education equality. Researching these two calls for very different methodological approaches. In the first case (human capital) an exploratory time-series estimation approach was applied (following Green et al., 2006). It is found that the macrosocial benefits of VET are, largely, equal to those of general education (of comparable level). In the second case (equity) institutional arrangements through which VET may influence education equity were explored qualitatively with selected country case studies. The evidence shows that reducing the academic/vocational divide, reducing tracking (or using IVET to reintegrate onto mainstream tracks), mitigating against gender or ethnic inequality in IVET and CVET, integrating IVET and CVET (for example through a national qualification system spanning both forms of VET) and aiding the transition between VET and labour markets, tend to promote education equality. So long as that appropriate institutional arrangements are made, VET is important for equity and, therefore, for social cohesion.Availability: (1)

Assuring quality in vocational education and training : the role of accrediting VET providers /

by European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training.

Publisher: Luxembourg Publications Office of the European Union 2011Description: PDF.Other title: Cedefop Reference series ; no. 90.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography pp. 207-217Summary: This publication examines how accreditation systems relate to quality assurance by means of 12 in-depth case studies. Of these, four relate to economic sectors, eight to countries. The results show that accreditation systems are widely accepted by providers, and deliver vocational education and training to predefined quality standards - with or without the direct involvement of public authorities. Accreditation has a clearing effect: weak performers disappear from the market and successfully accredited providers become more visible. The use of quality labels could be more widespread. It is mostly found in the sectoral examples, especially where the value of such labels can be clearly defined. The study shows that accreditation systems for vocational education and training can make sure that minimum standards are observed in VET delivery. For the future, the challenge will be to turn accreditation into a driving force for better quality. To do so, the study suggests a multistep approach to accreditation and concludes with recommendations for national, sectoral and European stakeholders.Availability: (1)

Working and ageing : guidance and counseling for mature learners /

by European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training.

Publisher: Luxembourg Publications Office of the European Union 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Includes bibliographical references.Summary: Population ageing is one of the most significant developments in Europe in the next decades. Guidance and counselling in supporting longer and more satisfying careers in ageing societies is important and has potential. This publication reviews factors contributing to successful active ageing from various angles. It examines contemporary approaches to guidance and counselling and presents several good practice examples of measures and practices launched in EU Member States. Successful approaches to guidance and counselling encompass a lifecycle perspective, are responsive and comprehensive and are supported by all stakeholders involved. The analysis and results reveal encouraging signs of progress, but at the same time indicate that much remains to be done to promote integration of ageing workers into the labour market and society.Availability: (1)

Exploring leadership in vocational education and training /

by European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training.

Publisher: Luxembourg Publications Office of the European Union 2011Description: PDF.Other title: European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training..Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Cat. No: TI-BA-11-003-EN-N doi:10.2801/36572 Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: European policy on vocational education and training (VET) makes a strong link between the quality of education and the quality of teachers and trainers. Teaching staff are important stakeholders in implementing current VET reforms, and their training and professional development are crucial elements in ensuring quality. However, this working paper argues that the role of those managing and leading VET institutions must be more widely acknowledged and that the research base and policy initiatives specifically related to such staff ought to be strengthened. There is increasing evidence of the importance of leadership in education, though VET leaders have, so far, received only marginal attention. Leaders are crucial in implementing reforms and policy initiatives; they also serve as catalysts for change. The close links between VET and the labour market create specific opportunities for leadership but this has not yet been subjected to European research. This working paper presents some initial findings on leadership in VET in Europe. Cedefop's main objective for this paper is to raise awareness of VET leadership, introducing the topic and escorting it onto the European policy agenda. As the scope and depth of this paper is limited, it should be seen as an initial contribution to discussing leadership in VET.Availability: (1)

The skill matching challenge : analysing skill mismatch and policy implications /

by European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training Cedefop).

Publisher: Luxembourg Publications Office of the European Union 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Includes bibliographySummary: "... This report aims to structure the currently scattered evidence on skill mismatch by analysing seven important questions. It provides a broad overview of skill mismatch and the factors that contribute to it, analyses its economic and social costs, and argues why skill mismatch should be a concern for national and European policy-makers. As information across different countries is currently limited, the report also discusses how skill mismatch can be better approached and measured in surveys, with the aim of enabling more detailed and sound analyses in the coming years."Availability: (1)

Lifelong learning : citizens' views /

by European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training.

Publisher: Luxembourg Publications Office of the European Union 2003Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: We have come a long way since the European Year of Lifelong Learning in 1996. By 2010, the European Union wants to become the most competitive and dynamic knowledge-based economic area in the world. Making lifelong learning a reality for all citizens is at the driving edge of the strategy to meet this goal and is the guiding principle for education and training policy at European level. To provide up-to-date information, the European Commission and Cedefop now present the results of a specially designed Eurobarometer (1), which directly asks citizens what they think about lifelong learning, including their participation in, experiences of and motivations for learning. Eurobarometer opinion polls complement large-scale surveys on education, training and employment issues. They take rapid snapshots of the overall picture and are well suited to gauge people's 'views of the moment'. This brochure includes the initial highlights of the survey findings and includes a brief country profile of Greece, the EU Presidency country at the time of publication. Later, Cedefop will publish a full analysis, enriched with comparable data from national surveys and qualitative studies on lifelong learning.Availability: (1)

Empowering adults through upskilling and reskilling pathways : volume 1 adult population with potential for upskilling and reskilling

by European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training.

Publisher: Luxembourg : Publications Office of the European Union, 2020Description: 97 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: This publication is the first volume of Cedefop research on empowering adults through upskilling and reskilling pathways. As 2020 approaches, and the EU is still far from attaining its benchmark of 15% adult participation in learning, our societies face multiple challenges: technological changes, including digitalisation and its consequences for the future of work; ageing societies; the need for the greening of the economy; and social inclusion. Europe must improve and maintain high-level skills and competences to remain competitive and innovative; skills are therefore essential, not only to access and progress in the labour market but also to achieve one’s full potential and play an active role in society. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Promoting learning for work

by European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training.

Publisher: Thessaloniki, Greece : Publications Office of the European Union, 2016Description: [24 p. : ill.] PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: European cooperation in vocational education and training (VET) has prompted reforms and has helped raise skills levels across the board. Education and training systems have become more flexible, offering pathways with more transition options. Education attainment is rising across Europe and VET is increasingly available in most Member States, both at secondary and tertiary levels. More people are in lifelong learning, although there is still much to be done to avert early leavers from school or VET with low or no qualifications. Digitalisation, with growing capacities of mobile devices, offers new interactive and remote ways of learning. We have come a long way.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Making VET fit for the future

by European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training.

Publisher: Thessaloniki, Greece : Publications Office of the European Union, 2018Description: [32 p. : ill.] PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Vocational education and training (VET) is high on the EU agenda. It is seen as a policy lever which can help address challenges in an increasingly globalised and technology-driven economy. The European Pillar of Social Rights asserts European citizens’ right to both excellent and inclusive education, training and lifelong learning, as a means of maintaining and acquiring skills that enable them to manage their learning and working lives and to participate fully in society. VET is central to achieving these goals. Cedefop, with its evidence-based research and VET policy analyses, is a hub for information sharing and networking. It supports the European Commission, Member States and social partners in all European strands of VET. While cooperation with the European Commission continues to be at the core of our work, Cedefop has dynamically developed its activities and services: we have been fostering transnational policy learning, closely involving governments and social partners; policy learning forums and various online tools on our website aid exchange of knowledge and experience. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Enhancing European cooperation in VET : outcomes of the Riga cycle : progress in common priorities for 2015-20

by European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training.

Publisher: Luxembourg : Publications Office of the European Union, 2020Description: 107 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: This Cedefop-ETF Riga final report recalls the state of play in 2015 and provides an overview of what EU countries (Member States plus Iceland and Norway) and candidate countries have done over the period 2015-19 to address the five priority areas for VET agreed by their ministers in iga in 2015. The report flags common trends across countries and aims to support their cooperation towards a common ambition for VET. While countries’ policy measures may look rather similar at aggregate level, their VET systems and policies do not start from the same point, and policy actions are firmly embedded into their respective contexts. Purpose, speed and progress vary: country examples illustrate the diversity within this apparent unity. Complementary country chapters look more in depth (1). Despite differences across countries, the evidence provided in the report indicates that VET systems have moved forward to emphasise that VET can be a credible first choice. Compared to the 2011-14 cycle, fewer and broader priority areas – the five medium-term deliverables (MTDs) – were agreed in Riga. When asked which MTD(s) they would assign high priority, a clear trend emerged across countries: strengthening work-based learning came first, with specific attention to apprenticeships (MTD 1), followed by access to VET and qualifications for all (MTD 3) and teacher and trainer professional development (MTD 5). Quality assurance and feedback loops (MTD 2) and key competences (MTD 4) were ranked ower by the countries.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The importance of being vocational : challenges and opportunities for VET in the next decade

by European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training | European Training Foundation.

Publisher: Luxembourg : Publications Office of the European Union, 2020Description: 24 p. : ill. PDF.Other title: Cedefop and ETF discussion paper.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: This discussion paper supports the idea that, in light of the future trends and the changing world of work, the emphasis of VET policy also needs to change. While further developing initial VET (IVET) should remain an essential aim, European policy needs to strengthen the focus on advancing continuing VET (CVET) to meet the economic and societal challenges of the next decade.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

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