Brotherhood of St Laurence

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Hot topic : ICT teaching and learning support services : strategic ICT advisory service /

by Lamshed, Reece | Australia. Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations 2009Description: v, 55 p. : ill.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: This report is part of the Strategic ICT Advisory Service, funded by the Australian Government?s Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations.Summary: This report uses a series of case studies to develop a dynamic and responsive ICT service model that attends to the day-to-day user demands and the ever-changing ICT environment, but at the same time, maintains standards and security.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Impacts of the new Job Seeker Compliance Framework : report of the independent review /

by Disney, Julian | Australia. Department of Education, Employment and Workplace elations | Buduls, Anna | Grant, Peter.

Publisher: [Canberra, A.C.T.] Australia. Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations 2010Description: PDF.Other title: Independent Review of the Job Seeker Compliance Framework : a.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: September 2010 INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: This Independent Review was established by the then Minister for Employment Participation, Senator the Hon. Mark Arbib, in compliance with the requirements of the Social Security Legislation Amendment (Employment Services Reform) Act 2009. That Act established a new system for achieving compliance with key requirements applying to people wishing to receive Newstart Allowance and some types of Youth Allowance, Parenting Payment and Special Benefit. The new system applies to requirements in relation to seeking work and improving prospects of finding work. It does not include the separate requirements to report changes in income, assets, marital status and other matters affecting ongoing eligibility.Availability: (1)

The future of disability employment services in Australia : discussion paper /

by Australia. Department of Education, Employment and Workplace elations.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations 2008Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: December 2008 Includes appendices. INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: Improving employment services for people with disability is a key priority for the Government. Disability employment services make a critical contribution to achieving social inclusion objectives and to improving the nation's productive capacity. It is vital that that all job seekers have access to employment services that respond effectively to individual circumstances, local labour market conditions and to employers. This paper sets out the Government's proposed improvements to disability employment services and seeks feedback on these proposals.Availability: (1)

Review of disability employment services : Disability Employment Network and Vocational Rehabilitation Services : a discussion paper /

by Australia. Department of Education, Employment and Workplace elations.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations 2008Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: September 2008 INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: Vocational Rehabilitation Services and the Disability Employment Network provide valuable services to job seekers with disability. Between them they offer job seekers specialist rehabilitation services, support and assistance in finding work and, where needed, ongoing support in the workplace. They also offer important services to employers, including help to retain existing employees. This review is an opportunity to take a fresh look at these services' to build on their strengths and to identify improvements.Availability: (1)

Review of funding for schooling : emerging issues paper /

by Australia. Department of Education, Employment and Workplace elations.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Department of Education Employment and Workplace Relations 2010Description: PDF.Other title: Gonski Review.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: December 2010 Includes bibliographical references Chairman: David GonskiSummary: The aim of this emerging issues paper is to present the views heard by the panel during its preliminary listening tour that was undertaken during the latter part of 2010 across all states and territories. The panel heard views from over 70 education groups, including government and non-government education authorities, Indigenous education and special education representatives, and parent, principal, teacher and union groups. The views summarised in this paper are not those of the panel, but of those who generously shared their views with the panel. The issues and concerns raised in submissions to the review have also been incorporated. While a range of issues were raised, discussion broadly centred around seven key themes: (1) equity of educational outcomes; (2) recurrent funding; (3) capital funding; (4) targeted and needs-based funding, including funding for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students; (5) support for students with special needs and students with disability; (6) governance and leadership; and (7) community and family engagement.Availability: (1)

Ageing and the barriers to labour force participation in Australia /

by Adair, Tim | National Seniors Productive Ageing Centre | Hosseini-Chavoshi, Meimanat.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Department of Education Employment and Workplace Relations 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: December 2011 Bibliography pp. 35-38 Appendix p. 39Summary: The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) projects that, between 2011 and 2020, the number of persons aged 50 and over in Australia will increase by more than 22 per cent. By 2050, the number aged 50 and over will have increased by over 80 per cent, or by 6.4 million. In comparison, the number of persons aged 18 to 49 is projected to grow by just over 35 per cent by 2050. This important demographic change, ceteris paribus, implies a greater role for mature age Australians both economically and in society more generally.Availability: (1)

Review of funding for schooling : final report /

by Australia. Department of Education, Employment and Workplace elations.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Department of Education Employment and Workplace Relations 2011Description: PDF.Other title: Gonski report.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: December 2011 Includes bibliographical references Chairman: David Gonski Includes bibliographical references and indexSummary: High-quality schooling fosters the development of creative, informed and resilient citizens who are able to participate fully in a dynamic and globalised world. It also leads to many benefits for individuals and society, including higher levels of employment and earnings, and better health, longevity, tolerance and social cohesion. Overall, Australia has a relatively high-performing schooling system when measured against international benchmarks, such as the Programme for International Student Assessment. However, over the last decade the performance of Australian students has declined at all levels of achievement, notably at the top end. This decline has contributed to the fall in Australia?s international position. In 2000, only one country outperformed Australia in reading and scientific literacy and only two outperformed Australia in mathematical literacy. By 2009, six countries outperformed Australia in reading and scientific literacy and 12 outperformed Australia in mathematical literacy. In addition to declining performance across the board, Australia has a significant gap between its highest and lowest performing students. This performance gap is far greater in Australia than in many Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries, particularly those with high-performing schooling systems. A concerning proportion of Australia?s lowest performing students are not meeting minimum standards of achievement. There is also an unacceptable link between low levels of achievement and educational disadvantage, particularly among students from low socioeconomic and Indigenous backgrounds. Funding for schooling must not be seen simply as a financial matter. Rather, it is about investing to strengthen and secure Australia?s future. Investment and high expectations must go hand in hand. Every school must be appropriately resourced to support every child and every teacher must expect the most from every child.Availability: (1)

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