Brotherhood of St Laurence

Economic insecurity and intimate partner violence in Australia during the COVID-19 pandemic / Anthony Morgan ; Hayley Boxall ; ANROWS

By: Morgan, Anthony | Australia's National Research Organisation for Women's Safety
Contributor(s): Boxall, Hayley
Series: Research report / Australia's National Research Organisation for Women's Safety ; 02/2022, January 2022Publisher: Sydney, NSW : Australia's National Research Organisation for Women's Safety (ANROWS), 2022Description: iv, 70 p. ill. PDFISBN: 9781922645166 (PDF)Subject(s): Violence Against Women | Domestic Violence | Family violence | Intimate partner violence | Finance, Personal | Economic Security | COVID-19 | Coronavirus | PandemicsOnline Resources: DOWNLOAD PDF
List(s) this item appears in: New Book List 2022
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The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted significant concerns about the “shadow pandemic” of violence against women and children, in particular intimate partner violence (IPV). There is now a large body of research in Australia exploring the effects of the pandemic on violence against women and children, and specifically IPV. The research has indicated that matters being referred to IPV services are more complex, and victims and survivors are experiencing increased barriers to reporting IPV and seeking support. Economic insecurity and intimate partner violence in Australia during the COVID-19 pandemic, led by Anthony Morgan and Hayley Boxall at the Australian Institute of Criminology, focuses on the intersection of economic insecurity and women’s experiences of IPV in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia. The findings are based on a survey of 10,000 women in Australia, aged 18 years and over, administered between February and April 2021. This report represents Stage 2 of a larger national study, with Stage 1 focusing on women’s experiences of IPV more broadly during the first 12 months of the pandemic. The report found that experiences of economic insecurity were common among women during the first 12 months of COVID-19. Economic insecurity was associated with an increased likelihood of IPV among women and co-occurred with other vulnerabilities reported by women which were associated with an increased likelihood of IPV. The report also found that economic disparity within relationships was associated with IPV – even after controlling for economic insecurity. The relationship between economic status, stress and disparity and IPV varied according to the type of IPV, and whether it was experienced as a chronic condition or an acute stressor. Finally, consistent with other Australian and international research, there was clear evidence that the acute economic stressors associated with the COVID-19 pandemic were associated with both the onset and escalation of IPV. [website] January 2022 Bibliography : p, 55-60 © ANROWS 2022

Item type Current library Call number Status Notes Date due Barcode
Electronic Brotherhood of St Laurence
Available CC BY-NC 3.0 AU

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